Difficulties Finding Dog Friendly Rental Property Could Become a Thing of the Past

As a dog owner, if you live in rented accommodation you may well have experienced problems in finding an appropriate property where the landlord is happy to accommodate pets. While it’s never a good idea to conceal the fact that you have a dog from a new landlord, with the prospect of living in a house unsuitable for your dog, having to part with your four legged friend or facing up to the fact that you could be without accommodation, it’s understandable why some people do so. However, with the advent of new insurance for landlords letting to pet owners, perhaps the shortage of dog friendly accommodation could in time be but a memory.

Dog Friendly Rental Property
Insurance to cover pet owners
Often landlords are reluctant to let to tenants with pets fearing that their furniture, carpets and woodwork will be damaged and that it will be difficult to remove traces of the animals even once they have left the property. However, 88% of landlords in a poll undertaken by the Dogs Trust would consider renting their homes to pet owners if appropriate cover was available against potential damage that might be caused. This is now possible thanks to a new insurance product offered by Endsleigh. This policy not only covers pet related damage, but also insures contents, potential unoccupancy and against owner liability.

Seeking responsible dog owners
Having been instrumental in bringing about the availability of landlord pet insurance, the Dogs Trust are also encouraging those renting out their properties to use the checklist available on their Lets with Pets website to identify responsible pet owners, as these same people also make responsible tenants. So don’t be surprised when looking for your next rental property if you are asked questions relating to your dog’s health care, exercise routines, toilet training and what arrangements you make when you leave your dog at home by itself. You will more than likely also have to provide a reference from your current landlord regarding your dog, though if you are new to renting, your dog’s vet can provide a suitable alternative. It also wouldn’t be unusual for your prospective landlord to ask to meet your dog so that they can see for themselves whether they would be happy for them to live in their property.

The small print
All being well and you and your dog are accepted as tenants, be sure to read the clause relating to pet ownership in the tenancy agreement so that you are fully aware of your obligations. It is also important to be clear about the deposit – which may well be higher if the landlord doesn’t have specific insurance for pet owners – and whether there is a non-refundable cleaning charge to cover the cost of professional cleaning of carpets, curtains and soft furniture after leaving the property.

Landlord obligations
As a responsible dog owner you recognise that you need to ensure that your dog is well exercised, behaves appropriately within the home, that you keep up to date with vaccinations and preventative measures against fleas and worms and always clean up after them. However, be sure that your landlord also takes their responsibilities seriously, as inviting pet owners to live in their properties requires them to take some additional measures themselves. If you notice that the boundary fence for instance has come into disrepair or that the gate does not close properly, both can pose a hazard to your dog, increasing the likelihood they escape, so your landlord has a duty to address these issues. Equally, if they have not provided covers for soft furnishings, ask whether they can do so; it shows you are responsible, seeking to protect their contents. Similarly, the vacuum they provide you with should be fit for the purpose of regular cleaning to take up the dog hair from carpets, so any issues with the appliance should be raised with your landlord. When both dog owners and landlords keep to their responsibilities, renting to pet owners works well for both parties.

Blog kindly added by ProBuyToLet (One of the UK’s leading sources of news and information for landlords and buy to let property investors)

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Celtic-K9 Trainer has the 4-1-1 on Dog Park Etiquette

etiquette is important for safety at the dog park
One of the most important things you must bring with you to your dog parks is a positive, calm, relaxed, and happy attitude. You must have a good strong leash (not a recoil leash as they are the worst type of leash for controlling your dog) and collar or harness. Never bring a dog to a dog park wearing a pinch collar. Also, remember to bring a good outdoor toy with which you and your dog love to play.
The first behavior I look for at a dog park is not the behavior of the dog but of the handler. I have noticed owners approaching a park all tense and rigid. This energy rubs off on their dog and in turn the dog enters the park all tense and defensive.  This energy transfers like a ripple in a pond. It can and has been the cause of many upsets in the park, usually resulting in some poor doggy having to leave too early.
I once watched a man stand alone in the middle of the dog park throwing a ball for his Shepherd mix. Every time he threw the ball, every dog in the park went crazy for the ball and charged after it. This big pack of dogs – all colors all breeds – charged together playing. The other dogs’ owners stood in a huddle together on the sidelines, pretty much ignoring their dogs. They were either too busy playing with the latest fad in technology or complaining about the world and its problems.
A short while later, a truck pulled into the car park and out jumped a short thin man with two of the most beautiful Bullies I have ever seen. They sat at the tail of the truck waiting for their leashes to be attached and to be led to the park to play. The man weighed approximately 150lbs and was leading approximately 180lbs of muscle. He led them with confidence and pride. As he entered the park, his two dogs sat and waited to be released.
As he started to release them, every handler in the park called their dog over and leashed them. As the owners became nervous and tense while trying to round up their dogs, three different fights broke out. The only dogs in the park not involved in the freeze of fear and stress were the two Pit Bulls and the Shepherd mix that had been chasing the ball.
What we need to learn from this situation is that sometimes (and I would argue that the majority of the time) it is the dog owner that causes the problems that we see in dogs. From the lack of understanding of the breed to their need to be exercised both physically and mentally, many dog owners fail to understand how their behavior directly affects their dog’s behavior.It is important to supervise your pet at the dog park

A lot of owners will bring their dogs to the park and release them to run in an unsupervised and unstructured environment. A dog running free in the park with no plan will create a game of his own which can be fun to watch but it can also encourage the dog to develop his own way of entertaining himself, which usually results in the development of a behavioral problem. Take a ball, a rope, or the good old trusty Kong-On-A-Rope to the park and play with your dog. Chase him and let him chase him you and reward him for playing. You cannot imagine the strong relationship that will develop simply by playing with your dog.
After all, what do you think your dog thinks you have been doing for the past eight hours while he has been protecting the house? So take him out and play and have fun with your dog – he’s earned it and so have you!

One of the most important things you must bring with you to your dog parks is a positive, calm, relaxed, and happy attitude. You must have a good strong leash (not a recoil leash as they are the worst type of leash for controlling your dog) and collar or harness. Never bring a dog to a dog park wearing a pinch collar. Also, remember to bring a good outdoor toy with which you and your dog love to play.

The first behavior I look for at a dog park is not the behavior of the dog but of the handler. I have noticed owners approaching a park all tense and rigid. This energy rubs off on their dog and in turn the dog enters the park all tense and defensive. This energy transfers like a ripple in a pond. It can and has been the cause of many upsets in the park, usually resulting in some poor doggy having to leave too early.

I once watched a man stand alone in the middle of the dog park throwing a ball for his Shepherd mix. Every time he threw the ball, every dog in the park went crazy for the ball and charged after it. This big pack of dogs – all colors all breeds – charged together playing. The other dogs’ owners stood in a huddle together on the sidelines, pretty much ignoring their dogs. They were either too busy playing with the latest fad in technology or complaining about the world and its problems.

A short while later, a truck pulled into the car park and out jumped a short thin man with two of the most beautiful Bullies I have ever seen. They sat at the tail of the truck waiting for their leashes to be attached and to be led to the park to play. The man weighed approximately 150lbs and was leading approximately 180lbs of muscle. He led them with confidence and pride. As he entered the park, his two dogs sat and waited to be released.

As he started to release them, every handler in the park called their dog over and leashed them. As the owners became nervous and tense while trying to round up their dogs, three different fights broke out. The only dogs in the park not involved in the freeze of fear and stress were the two Pit Bulls and the Shepherd mix that had been chasing the ball.

What we need to learn from this situation is that sometimes (and I would argue that the majority of the time) it is the dog owner that causes the problems that we see in dogs. From the lack of understanding of the breed to their need to be exercised both physically and mentally, many dog owners fail to understand how their behavior directly affects their dog’s behavior.

(alt text: It is important to supervise your pet at the dog park)

A lot of owners will bring their dogs to the park and release them to run in an unsupervised and unstructured environment. A dog running free in the park with no plan will create a game of his own which can be fun to watch but it can also encourage the dog to develop his own way of entertaining himself, which usually results in the development of a behavioral problem. Take a ball, a rope, or the good old trusty Kong-On-A-Rope to the park and play with your dog. Chase him and let him chase him you and reward him for playing. You cannot imagine the strong relationship that will develop simply by playing with your dog.

After all, what do you think your dog thinks you have been doing for the past eight hours while he has been protecting the house? So take him out and play and have fun with your dog – he’s earned it and so have you!

Blog post added by Celtic K9

Win a 7 night self catering holiday with Happy Donkey Hill in West Wales

This month we have teamed up with Happy Donkey Hill who are very generously giving one lucky Good Dog Guide winner a one week self catering holiday. The prize consists of 7 nights in Millers Cottage for the week commencing 27th September 2013, (other dates may be negotiable) for 4 people and an unlimited number of dogs (within reason).

Happy Donkey Hill    Dog Friendly Accommodation in Cardiganshire    Dog Friendly Holidays in Llandysul

Happy Donkey Hill is situated in an isolated, elevated position with panoramic views of the surrounding valley, providing self catering cottages and bed and breakfast dog friendly holiday accommodation. The luxurious rooms and friendly hospitality make Happy Donkey Hill the perfect base to explore West Wales.

Dog Friendly Accommodation    Dogs Allowed

Please visit Happy Donkey Hill to see virtual tours of all the cottages and bed and breakfast accommodation.

For your chance to win this great holiday just click here and complete the form before 30/05/2013.

Lyme Disease across the UK

Urgent advice for pet owners as health experts warn of spread of Lyme Disease across the UK
Watch our video for advice from David Bellamy on how to spot potentially deadly ticks on your dog and how to keep yourself and your family safe

As experts warn of the rapid spread of Lyme disease across the UK because of an increase in ticks, protests and public events are taking place around the world, including at Whitehall, to illustrate the lack of awareness about the disease and how it is spreading here.

tick

Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in the Northern Hemisphere  and there are concerns in the UK about the lack of public awareness, given recent warnings by leading animal health experts and parasitologists about a considerable increase in the disease-carrying tick parasite, posing a growing health threat to humans and their pets.

The tick parasite which is commonly found in long grass and areas of dense vegetation, attaches itself to dogs, cats and humans. In the past, ticks were only considered a hazard in select parts of Britain at particular times of year. But because of our changing climate they are now prevalent year-round, across the country.

Lyme disease in humans has increased threefold over the past decade, with up to 3,000 cases of Lyme Disease estimated to occur every year in people in England & Wales according to The Health Protection Agency.

A recent study from Bayer Animal Health as part of their ongoing ‘It’s a Jungle Out There’ parasite awareness initiative reveals that more than one in ten pet owners surveyed have found ticks on themselves or a family member, and that 53% of pets are not treated for this parasite.

The tick parasite uses highly developed mouthparts to pierce the skin and feed on the blood of its host. In humans, the first sign of Lyme Disease is commonly a circular rash around the area of the bite, and symptoms include fever, muscle and joint pain, tiredness and headaches.

So how can you keep your dog, yourself and your family safe?

To help pet owners understand the dangers of ticks and other parasites Bayer Animal Health have produced a series of short films featuring botanist David Bellamy, TV vet Steve Leonard and an array of parasite experts. This video focuses on the risk from ticks.

Pet owners can also find information about the most common parasites in the UK at www.itsajungle.co.uk, where they can complete an online risk assessment. You can help spread the word by liking ‘Jungle for Pets’ on Facebook or by following ‘JungleForPets’ on Twitter.

TICKS: The facts

A tick is a small, blood sucking arthropod

Normally ticks live on blood from larger animals, like deer, but they may also attach themselves to dogs, cats and even humans.

Ixodes ricinus is the most common tick in the UK and Ireland

Ticks lie in wait in vegetation and attach themselves to their host as it  brushes  past

Ticks have highly developed mouthparts, which allow them to pierce a hole through the skin to feed on blood

They can cause reactions at the site of attachment

Ticks may cause anaemia if there is a severe infestation on a young animal

The most important risk associated with ticks is the diseases they can transmit, eg. Lyme Disease in the UK  and Ireland.

Up to 3,000 cases of Lyme Disease are estimated to occur every year in people in England and Wales, according to The Health Protection Agency

Diseases such as Babesiosis and Ehrlichiosis can be transmitted to pets travelling abroad, therefore regular tick treatment of travelling pets is important