The perfect solution to all your dog friendly needs

Head on the keyboard, I’ve had enough.  I’m tired of looking for the perfect solution to my needs.  I grab my coffee and head over to the back door where I stick my head out for some fresh air, oh I wish I could have a holiday somewhere quiet away from it all.  I know that’s not possible because of Lula my mix breed dog, she’s an absolute nightmare on the lead, in the house, in the car, you name it I hide from it!  So here I am stuck at home with my barking, lead pulling (that’s why we don’t get out much) dog.  I do love her and want to have a special bond with her but I can’t find what I’m looking for, I don’t even know what I’m looking for.

I pick up a tennis ball and throw it into the garden, Lula loves to play a game of fetch, it brings her alive and she brings it back and runs to fetch it, this could go on for hours how come it doesn’t make her tired?  I bring her in and try to wipe her paws, yes you guessed it she doesn’t like that either and we end up in a wrestling match with me flat on my face in the middle of the kitchen floor.

That’s it, I’ve had enough! I slam the back door and head out of the kitchen back to the computer.  I know what I’m looking for!  Dog Trainer in King’s Lynn is added to the web browser.  Dog Trainers, Behaviourists and Clubs/King’s Lynn/Norfolk wow that’s the one! I click and get a bright dog friendly page full of dog trainers in King’s Lynn.  I look though a few of the premium pages and it catches my eye Game Based Trainer.  Lula it is meant to be young lady, today is day one of our new journey.

The website was bright, light and full of fun, showing how games created learning through choice – I was hooked and clicked on the Make an Enquiry button on The Good Dog Website.  Excited I jumped up and made another coffee returning quickly to The Good Dog Guide website and where it said click to choose a category I chose Self Catering and in lovely Norfolk.  I booked our holiday for September which gives us four months of intensive game based training sessions to have the best holiday ever!

Thank you The Good Dog Guide you have it all covered!

Article supplied by to Julie Carter at MyLuka Dog Training Solutions

Dog Heartworm: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

The heartworm is a dangerous and potentially deadly parasite that is transmitted to dogs by mosquitoes. Here are some answers to frequently asked questions on this prevalent canine medical condition.

What are the symptoms?

The severity of the symptoms determines its classification. Dogs can have Class 1, Class 2 or Class 3 heartworm disease.

Class 1
It its earliest stages, dogs that have heartworm disease may not present any symptoms at all, making the condition especially difficult to detect and treat.

Class 2
Dogs with Class 2 heartworm disease may suffer from chronic bouts of coughing and become increasingly reluctant to engage in physical activity.

Class 3
Class 3 is the most severe form of the disease. At this stage, symptoms may include fainting, intolerance to exercise, diarrhea, vomiting, fainting and anemia. The veterinarian may also find that the dog has an abnormal heart rate and high blood pressure.


Is heartworm dangerous?
Heartworm may lead to high blood pressure and lethargy, and eventually cause heart failure. It is imperative that you have your dog examined as soon as possible if you suspect that it’s infected.

The veterinarian may perform an electrocardiograph scan to look for any abnormalities of the heart. Diagnosing and treating heartworm disease can save your dog’s life.

How is heartworm treated?
Young heartworms can be killed with a medication called prophylaxis. Dogs that have adult heartworms will need to be hospitalized and will also need a medication that will need to be professionally administered. This medication is often referred to as an adulticide.

Some dogs will be released after a short period of time. Others will need to stay longer. Dogs that have blood clots or other complications may need to be hospitalized extended periods of time.

Your pet’s activity will need to be restricted after they are given the adulticide. During recovery, veterinarians also recommend that dogs follow a low-sodium diet.

The success rate of adulticide is quite high, with close to 98% of dogs showing no signs of heartworm disease once the treatment has been completed.

Can heartworm disease be prevented?
There are many things that can be done to prevent heartworm disease. Firstly, dogs that are at risk will need to be given prophylaxis on a regular basis and undergo blood tests. Protecting your dog from mosquitoes by making sure that it wears repellent can also help minimize the risk.

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Give your dog up to 8 months of protection

We all want to protect our four-legged friends from the threat of fleas and ticks and it’s not always easy to know the best way to do this with the myriad of products available. From shampoos to spot-ons to collars to tablets; the options seem endless. Here we will look at the benefits of a vet recommended collar, trusted by experts, which is now available without the need for a prescription – Seresto Flea and Tick Control collar.

Fleas and ticks

Fleas and ticks – more than just a bite
Fleas and ticks are both blood feeding parasites that will happily use your pet (and even you!) for a free meal. However, the impact of fleas and ticks on your dog can be greater than ‘just a bite’…

Fleas:
Flea Allergy Dermatitis (FAD) – this condition is an allergic reaction to flea saliva that irritates the skin and can cause intense itching for your dog.

Tapeworm – if your dog ingests an infected flea they can become infected with tapeworm.

Diseases – infected fleas can pass on diseases to dogs when they bite. One study found that half of fleas carried at least one bacterial disease

Anaemia – multiple flea bites can lead to loss of blood, resulting in anaemia, which is particularly dangerous for flea-infested puppies, small breeds, elderly dogs and pregnant bitches, who may also be more vulnerable to heavy infestation.

Fleas are also prolific breeders, with females laying up to 2,000 eggs in their lifetime. The majority of the flea life cycle doesn’t actually occur on your furry friend – the eggs drop off around your home, developing into larvae, pupae and then juvenile fleas. In fact, only 5% of the flea population is found on your pet in an infestation, the other 95% is in the environment – lurking in carpets and soft furnishings! This can make treating a flea infestation tricky, as you not only need to think about treating your pets, but also your home. Ensuring your dog is protected from fleas can help to protect you and your home from an infestation.

Ticks:
Ticks can carry a range of diseases, which can be transmitted to your dog when they bite and feed. These include Lyme disease and canine babesiosis, both of which are serious conditions and require veterinary treatment. Using a product on your dog that repels and kills ticks before they get a chance to bite helps to prevent them passing on any nasty diseases.

Prevention is better than treatment:
Seresto Flea and Tick Control collar kills fleas and repels & kills ticks without the need for them to bite your pet * The collar’s slow-release dosing allows the active ingredients to spread across your pet’s skin and coat at a controlled and steady rate, for all-over protection. It lasts for up to eight months in a single application – the longest lasting flea and tick protection available.

The vet-recommended collar is easy to use – just pop it on your dog for up to eight months of protection and up to #8months of love. No mess, no grease, no smell – and no need to remember monthly flea and tick applications. For the adventurers out there, the collar is water-resistant, † and the ratchet-release system allows it to loosen if your pet gets snagged on their travels!

Fleas and ticks are a year-round problem so it is important to use preventatives throughout the year to keep your pet protected. Seresto Flea and Tick Control collar is now available without a prescription from your vet, online and at pet stores, making it easier than ever to keep your pet protected year-round.

For more information about Seresto Flea and Tick Control collar visit: http://bit.ly/2VuJYjr

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Dogs and Portion Control – How much should you be feeding your Dog?

dog food

How much and how often you should be feeding your canine friend is a topic of frequent contention among dog owners, particularly as there is a lot of conflicting information available out there. With so many different brands and types of feed available on the market, it can be tricky knowing what the correct portions should be, based on your dog’s breed, size and activity levels.

Obesity in dogs continues to be a problem, and with over 60% of vets stating that the biggest health and welfare concern for pets in the UK is them being overweight, it is important to ensure your dog is eating the right amount of food.

Here, we discuss the key factors to take into consideration when determining how much food to give your dog.

Age
From the very moment you bring your beautiful new puppy home, you are in control of how their diet and lifestyle will affect their growth and health. As such, ensuring that they are eating the correct number of meals per day for each stage of their life is essential.

Generally speaking, puppies between 8-12 weeks old should be eating around four meals per day. Then, from 12 weeks to six months, this can be reduced to three meals, and dropping down to two meals as they continue to grow. When a dog enters their adult life, just one meal per day is sufficient to provide them with the energy and nutrition they need.

It is important to stick to one type of food and refrain from feeding them too many doggie treats, since this can lead to excessive calorie intake, which can, of course, make them overweight or lead to an upset stomach. If you are noticing your dog looking larger than before, or if they are going to the toilet more than usual, this may be a sign that they are eating more than they should be.

Bear in mind that the age at which you should switch from puppy/junior dog food to adult food will vary from breed to breed. In general, small dog breeds normally make the transition between 8-10 months old, and larger breeds between 12-18 months. Check with your vet for specific advice and information regarding your dog.

Lifestyle and activity
Once your dog hits adulthood, one major factor which will determine their daily food allowance will be their lifestyle, especially how active they are. Again, observation and judgement should be exercised, particularly since not all breeds conform to their stereotypes. Infamous speed-merchants like Greyhounds can, in fact, turn out to be total couch-potatoes. Likewise, tiny Chihuahuas can be highly-active racers!

As such, understanding the behaviour and characteristics of your pet in particular is key, since too little or too much food can greatly affect their health and growth. If you notice changes to your dog, be sure to adjust their portions in order to keep a good Body Condition Score (BCS).

You can easily tell if your dog isn’t eating the right amount, simply by their appearance and behaviour. Take a look at your pet from above – he/she should have a slight waist. You should also be able to feel their ribs, but they should not be visible. Your dog’s coat should also be glossy and dandruff-free. If their energy levels are strange for their breed (e.g. too lethargic or too hyper-active), this may also be a sign that they are not eating the right amount or type of dog food. In this case, food allergies should not be ruled out, and your vet might recommend switching to a hypoallergenic dog food.

Dog size and breed
The breed and size of your dog are crucial factors to consider when determining their diet and portion sizes. For instance, different dog breeds of the same size may have different energy levels and thus, require more or less food. Similarly, large dog breeds can greatly benefit from feeds which support and protect growing joints.

When purchasing dog food, always check the label, which will outline a general food/weight guide, but these should only be used as a reference, rather than an absolute.

The best way to determine if your best friend is eating the right amount of food is to simply practice good judgement, keep an eye or their portions, and observe them regularly for changes. This way, your dog will continue to live a long, happy and healthy life!

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Dog Food Allergies

So, your beloved pet is itching like crazy, biting himself all over, constantly shaking his head, and you even notice patches of fur missing. At first you think he might have fleas, but you’re always diligent with your monthly flea & tick treatment. So you rush him to the vet, and hear something new: you dog might have food allergies.

What is a Dog Food Allergy?
What does this mean exactly, and how in the world do you treat it? Well, allergies in both humans and dogs, in short, begin close to the same way. An allergic reaction happens when a dog’s (or human’s) immune system misinterprets a protein coming from a certain ingredient (n the case of food allergies) as a harmful foreign invader, and either attacks it or mounts some other kind of immune response.

Thankfully, dog food allergies are rarely life threatening, but can cause a wealth of irritating symptoms. Dog food allergies are actually caused by a genetic problem, and is triggered by initial exposure to the allergen. The most common dog food allergens are:

  • Beef
  • Dairy
  • Wheat
  • Egg
  • Chicken
  • Lamb
  • Soy
  • Pork
  • Rabbit
  • Fish

About 10% of all allergy cases in dogs are food related.

Dogs usually react to food allergens differently than a human might. With humans, we often hear of horrible cases where a person’s airway closes, and they might need extreme drugs like Epinephrine to stay alive. In dogs, on the other hand, an allergic reaction often appears in the form of irritated, itchy or inflamed skin, or sometimes produces gastrointestinal issues like vomiting or diarrhea.

In some very rare cases, food allergies can send a dog into anaphylaxis (severe, life threatening allergic reaction), similar to a human suffering from a severe reaction to a bee sting, although that is very uncommon.

Common Signs & Symptoms of Food Allergies:

  • Itchiness
  • Hives
  • Swelling of the face, ears, lips, eyelids, or earflaps
  • Red, inflamed skin
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Sneezing
  • Itchy ears

There are several food allergy symptoms listed here, but the most common sign you will see is non-seasonal itching, usually focused on either the entire body or limited to the ears and feet. You might see chronic or recurrent skin infections. It does take time for food allergies to develop, and they usually aren’t immediate; your dog could have been eating the same food for a while without any reactions.

‘Novel’ Protein
A ‘food trial’ with a hypoallergenic dog food, like the ones listed below, is the best and most common way to diagnose a food allergy. These trials use a ‘novel’ protein source, which is hopefully something completely new to your dog or different from what he has had before. This reduces the chance of an immune response, hopefully eliminating the specific protein causing the allergic reaction.

Hydrolyzed diets, in addition, are created when animal proteins are broken down into much smaller molecules, making it difficult for the immune system to recognize harmful allergens and drastically reducing the chances of an allergic reaction.

How are Dog Food Allergies Treated?
So, your dog is allergic to a certain ingredient in his food. You certainly don’t want to keep feeding him that food! The first step, and only one needed really, is eliminating that particular ingredient from his food. Since most dog foods are composed of many ingredients, the easiest way to do this is narrowing down those ingredients from many to a few.

Limited Ingredient Dog Food
In order to offer a wide range of nutrients, manufacturers often use many ingredients in their foods. In this case, it can actually be harmful to offer so many- at least until we figure out what the ‘culprit’ is, so you veterinarian might prescribe a ‘Limited Ingredient Dog Food’. These are exactly how they sound, foods with fewer ingredients meant to help treat a dog’s sensitive stomach.

First, your veterinarian will prescribe a certain limited ingredient food. If that doesn’t do the trick, they will switch to an alternate food made from different ingredients, and so on.

There are many limited ingredient foods out there, but most of them are lower quality and cheaply manufactured. Below, we’ve listed five quality names, known for producing good, nutritional dog foods.

Some Limited Ingredient Dog Foods:
Canidae Grain-Free Pure Limited Ingredient Diet
Earthborn Holistic Venture Turkey Meal and Butternut Squash Limited Ingredient Diet
Merrick Limited Ingredient Diet Grain Free Salmon & Sweet Potato
Nulo Freestyle Limited Plus Puppy and Adult Dog Food
Wellness Simple Limited Ingredient Diet

Food Intolerance vs. Food Allergy
When most people think their dog is having an allergic reaction to food, the culprit is actually food intolerance. A food intolerance doesn’t involve an immune response, and doesn’t stimulate histamines. For example, some dogs might be ‘lactose intolerant’, meaning a dog’s body won’t process the lactose found in milk well. Many humans are lactose intolerant also. These intolerances can lead to GI issues.

A study done in 2017 estimated that out of all dogs seeing a veterinarian for any issue, only about 1-2% actually had a food allergy or intolerance. That being said, it isn’t very common. Even then, true food allergies are less common than intolerances.

Meat, dairy and eggs are probably the most common allergens in dog food. It’s usually a protein in these foods that is the problem, not the food itself. In the wild, animal meat makes up most of a dog or wolve’s diet, so you can assume how rare an allergy to it would be.

Conclusion: What to Do?
You see your dog itching constantly, acting strange; his behavior is actually starting to change. What should you do if you think your pup might have a dog food allergy? Bring your pooch in for an exam, and talk this over with your veterinarian! Your vet has the knowledge and experience needed to develop the absolute best plain of attack for your pet’s ‘itchy issue’!

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Why You Should Buy A Dog Stroller

Having a dog stroller sounded quite weird some years back. Nowadays, dog strollers have gained popularity thanks to the numerous benefits they offer. There are various occasions and situation that make it necessary to use a stroller. They are very effective, convenient and comfortable to your dog. Here are a few reasons to get a stroller.

1, Easier for vet visit
Transporting dogs in a stroller when taking them to the vet, especially small puppies, is convenient and eliminates worries of the puppies escaping. A stroller also protects your dog from picking up germs from the floor or other animals in the waiting room. It’s also comfortable in case your dog is convalescing.

2, Ideal for outings
If you’re going out with friends or family, using a stroller can be convenient. You won’t need to worry about your dog as you have your lunch, go to a concert, or indulge in other fun activities. In such crowded places, you don’t have to worry about your dog getting stepped on or picking dangerous stuff. You can also be able to carry your dog once in a while to the office as the stroller provides a confined place for the dog.

3, Ideal for injured and old dogs
A stroller provides a comfortable ride for old, sick and injured dogs that are too weak to walk. Getting such dogs some fresh air and change of scenery may be refreshing, and that’s where the stroller comes handy. A dog that has undergone surgery may need mental stimulation and physical exercise to recuperate.

4, Protection
There is always the danger of your dog, especially the small ones, being attacked by aggressive dogs. A stroller will also protect your precious pet paws from rough sidewalks and pavements. Some dogs are also susceptible to extreme weather conditions. A stroller will protect your dog from excess heat and snow. It also ideal in urban areas where there is a lot of traffic which can be overwhelming for the dog.

5, Better Exercise
It’s fun when you take your dog along for runs and walks. However, it might be hard for the dog to keep up. Therefore, you can bring along a stroller for the dog to ride in. This way, you still get the most out of your workout without tiring your dog. It’s also a great opportunity to have more quality time with your best friend.

6, Ideal for elderly people
A walk is a great way for elderly people to refresh and exercise. However, for the elderly pet lovers who love to tag their pets along, it might be difficult because the dog that can easily stray. A stroller will help keep the dog restrained.

7, Great or multiple dogs
Walking more than one dog can turn out to be a nightmare. It can be tough to control them as they keep running in every direction during walks. Keeping one or more of the dogs in a stroller can save you from all this trouble and keep your pets safe.

A stroller is a great item for pet owners to invest in. It brings convenience and greater mobility to both you and your buddy. However, with the many options available in the market, you may find it hard determining the best one for your dog. Not sure which one to choose? Check out 8 Best Dog Strollers for 2019 | iPetCompanion.

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How to Make Bathing Your Dog as Easy and Stress-Free as Possible

On television and in the movies, giving a dog a bath looks like a lot of fun. People are always laughing and smiling as their adorable dog sprays suds everywhere and splashes around. In the real world, however, bathing a dog is usually a lot more complicated.

Despite their excellent sense of smell, dogs are completely fine with the idea of roaming around smelling bad, covered in dirt and grime. Most dogs balk at the idea of bathing, doing their best to wriggle away. Even though bath time is usually funny in the movies, it isn’t quite as much fun when you are the one trying to pin down a wet, sudsy dog that is struggling to get away.

Fortunately, there are some ways that you can make bath time a little less stressful – not just for your dog but also for yourself.

Find A Way to Make Bath Time a Positive Experience
Associating something positive with bathing can change the way that your dog views bath time. Most dogs love toys and treats. Make sure you are armed with plenty of treats from Dog Product Picker. A good scratch behind the ears doesn’t hurt anything, either. When dogs learn that good things happen during bath time, they are a lot less likely to put up a fight when you try to give them a bath.

To start helping your dog develop positive feelings about bathing, leave the water out of the equation. Instead, have them get into an empty bathtub. While they are there, give them tasty treats and find some fun toys that they can play with. As they start to adapt to the idea of being in the tub, you can begin to add a small amount of warm water.

It may take a lot of repetition before your dog starts to behave the way that you want them to. For instance, if there is a particular area where you give your dog baths, call them to that area, providing them with a treat whenever they come. Eventually, they will learn to come on command, even if you don’t give them a treat.

Avoid Getting Soap or Water in Their Ears
One of the most important things to avoid when bathing your dog is getting water or soap in their ears. The water can not only annoy your dog but it also can wind up harming their health.

Some dogs will allow you to tuck cotton balls gently under their ears. If your dog won’t tolerate that, however, you will just need to use caution to keep from getting water where it shouldn’t be.

Train Your Dog from An Early Age
The best time to start giving your dog baths is while they are still young. Puppies are a lot more open to the idea of bathing. The sooner you start getting on a regular bathing routine, the more likely your dog is to do well with baths later in life.

Choose A Shampoo That Is Formulated for Dogs
Using the wrong shampoo can leave your dog feeling itchy and uncomfortable. Harsh shampoos can strip the moisture from their skin, leaving it dry and flaky. Choose a mild shampoo that is formulated for dogs. That way, you can get your dog clean without washing away their skin’s natural oil. Ask your vet for recommendations when it comes to choosing a shampoo.

Start at The Neck
To avoid getting soap or water in your dog’s mouth, eyes, or nose, start washing at their neck and work your way down. This can be done with a cup filled with water or with a spray nozzle. They even make special sprayers that are made expressly for giving dogs baths. When it comes to cleaning their head, stick with a damp cloth rather than a bucket or sprayer.

Use the Correct Drying Method
Some people opt for drying their dog out with a hairdryer. However, most dogs balk at the loud noise and strange sensation of having their fur dried. If you do use a hairdryer, set the heat low so that you don’t accidentally burn your dog.

Towel drying your dog is usually a lot less stressful, even though it doesn’t get them quite as dry. Stores that sell pet products usually carry special dog drying towels that are designed to be extremely absorbent. Remember, as well, that your dog will most likely shake when they get out of the tub. Try to protect the area from flying water droplets ahead of time.

Turning bath time into a positive experience can benefit both you and your dog. When giving your dog a bath, maintain a relaxed demeanor while still letting your dog know that you are in control. Over time, bath time can become a ritual that you both enjoy.

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Why I started the ‘Respect the lead campaign’

I was out walking with my family and my dog over New year at a local beauty spot. Towards the end of our walk I heard a dog fight close by, there were screams of ‘help’ and so my veterinary mode kicked in and I found myself running over.

Just as I got to the gathering crowd someone threw something towards the dogs which momentarily distracted them and they came apart. I checked over one of the dogs whilst the other dog was led away by its upset owner. The first dog was fine however a comment about blood alerted me to the fact that the other dogs owner had a nasty bite to his hand. By this time there were quite a few strong words exchanged and so I walked away.

I wanted to check the other dog & owner and finally found them in the car park. Fortunately both dogs were unscathed but sadly the owner had a deep bite that needed urgent medical attention. I gave some human first aid advice and had a long chat with them about the incident. They were very upset as they had been walking their reactive dog on a lead and when it had been approached by a very enthusiastic bouncy young dog they had requested it was taken away. Sadly this was ignored and after about the 10th time of asking their dog reacted and so a fight broke out. As I walked away I felt sad for the owner, disappointed that they were doing the ‘right thing’ by keeping their dog on a lead and warning others to stay away…yet still their requests were ignored.

My own current dog had issues when I first rescued him and I spent a lot of time training him to be calmer and accepting of other dogs around him. He does stay on the lead a lot of the time and I too encounter many owners who let their dogs come charging over, fortunately with the groundwork I have put in and the training I continue to take with me on a walk I can deal with it…however many people can’t. As soon as you put a lead on a dog everything changes for them and so we need to respect this, understand why and act accordingly……………..

As the days went on after the incident, I kept thinking about what I had seen and felt passionately that something needed to be done to raise awareness of lead etiquette.

So after a lot of thought, planning and design my ‘Respect the lead’ campaign was born……… It has had amazing coverage on social media and I have had many requests for posters (all over the world!). The support has been overwhelming and I am still to this day amazed at the impact it seems to have made in the dog owning world.

Let’s continue to spread the awareness so that everyone can enjoy their dog walks and together we can help our canine friends ……who may be kept on a lead for a reason.

Article supplied.

Grooming your Puppy for the First Time

All good dog owners know that grooming isn’t just about primping your pet to look cute; it’s also about maintaining good health.

The first time you groom your puppy is an important occasion that requires careful preparation and dedication. Don’t be put off by your inexperience; it’s easy to do once you know how. If you approach the situation armed with good advice and confidence, all will go smoothly for you and your furry friend.

Puppies are obviously going to be more challenging to groom than an older dog, and the first grooming experience is much like a child’s first haircut, i.e. expect some tears and tantrums!

Grooming Preparation:
In the weeks before grooming, concentrate on building a positive relationship with your puppy and ensure he is as comfortable as possible with touch and being handled in anyway. This is probably the most important thing you can do to prepare for grooming. Your aim is to make each session a calming, bonding experience.

You can practice this with positive reinforcement whenever you feed your puppy from your hand; stroke your puppy as it is lying down and gradually teach that being held by you is not dangerous.

Create a friendly environment so that your puppy immediately knows that whatever is about to happen is safe and enjoyable. Show affection with petting and soothing words so that the puppy is relaxed.

Keep your first groom session short, that way the puppy won’t misbehave and when you are ready for a second session, your puppy will be more used to the process and you can gradually go for longer each time.

Keep your puppy loosely restrained so that you can maintain your control without frightening him is also important.

Bath Time
Begin with a nice, relaxing bath using puppy shampoo and conditioner. Take care not to get soap in the puppy’s eyes. To really put your dog at ease, you can give it a massage as you work your way lathering down the back towards the tail and back legs.

Brushing
For the first session keep the brushing to a minimum. Be aware that any brushes, clippers and tools might alarm the puppy so show each brush or comb to the pup first before giving a treat as a reward. Do this a few times before then giving the puppy a few short strokes with the item. Be mindful of sensitive areas at first like inner legs and tail.

Clipping
Remember that clipping your dog’s claws is not the same as trimming your own nails. Cut at a 45-degree angle so as to avoid trimming the blood vessel that runs into the nail (which will be a painful experience for your dog if it gets cut by mistake!). You need to only cut the part of the nail that extends beyond this blood vessel known as a ‘quick.’

If unsure about clipping claws you should seek advice from a vet beforehand.

Grooming sessions at first should be short but done fairly often so that your puppy becomes accustomed to them and learns to associate them as just another fun activity to share with you.

Ruff Guide to a Dog Friendly Home

The silly grin and gentle tail wag from our furry friends never fail to brighten our day. Not only do dogs make excellent house pets, but they are also proven to make our lives happier. After all, all they do is makes us laugh and smile (except of course if they get a poop or pee accident!).

However, it’s not all about them making us happy, because we, as responsible dog owners should also bring back the favor to them. There are lots of ways you can do that, one of which is by making your home as dog-friendly as possible.

Let them roam freely and safely inside your house and backyard and giving them quick access to essentials like food and water goes a long way for your canine buddies. You can also give them toys to play on so that they won’t get bored and be destructive.

It’s all about ensuring that they stay healthy, both physically and emotionally. And take note, dogs have feelings too!

Well, some of you might think that having a dog is a walk-in-the-park — but it’s not.

It’s just like raising a child, except for the fact that it’s harder! But then again, it’s not a big problem because we’re going to help you become a responsible dog owner. As long as you love what you’re doing and you know what to do, then you’re on your way to raising your “super dog”.

Want to know more? If so, then scroll down to check out this creatively informative graphic from AXA. It’s a life saver!

Ruff Guide to a Dog Friendly Home