Dog Food Allergies

So, your beloved pet is itching like crazy, biting himself all over, constantly shaking his head, and you even notice patches of fur missing. At first you think he might have fleas, but you’re always diligent with your monthly flea & tick treatment. So you rush him to the vet, and hear something new: you dog might have food allergies.

What is a Dog Food Allergy?
What does this mean exactly, and how in the world do you treat it? Well, allergies in both humans and dogs, in short, begin close to the same way. An allergic reaction happens when a dog’s (or human’s) immune system misinterprets a protein coming from a certain ingredient (n the case of food allergies) as a harmful foreign invader, and either attacks it or mounts some other kind of immune response.

Thankfully, dog food allergies are rarely life threatening, but can cause a wealth of irritating symptoms. Dog food allergies are actually caused by a genetic problem, and is triggered by initial exposure to the allergen. The most common dog food allergens are:

  • Beef
  • Dairy
  • Wheat
  • Egg
  • Chicken
  • Lamb
  • Soy
  • Pork
  • Rabbit
  • Fish

About 10% of all allergy cases in dogs are food related.

Dogs usually react to food allergens differently than a human might. With humans, we often hear of horrible cases where a person’s airway closes, and they might need extreme drugs like Epinephrine to stay alive. In dogs, on the other hand, an allergic reaction often appears in the form of irritated, itchy or inflamed skin, or sometimes produces gastrointestinal issues like vomiting or diarrhea.

In some very rare cases, food allergies can send a dog into anaphylaxis (severe, life threatening allergic reaction), similar to a human suffering from a severe reaction to a bee sting, although that is very uncommon.

Common Signs & Symptoms of Food Allergies:

  • Itchiness
  • Hives
  • Swelling of the face, ears, lips, eyelids, or earflaps
  • Red, inflamed skin
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Sneezing
  • Itchy ears

There are several food allergy symptoms listed here, but the most common sign you will see is non-seasonal itching, usually focused on either the entire body or limited to the ears and feet. You might see chronic or recurrent skin infections. It does take time for food allergies to develop, and they usually aren’t immediate; your dog could have been eating the same food for a while without any reactions.

‘Novel’ Protein
A ‘food trial’ with a hypoallergenic dog food, like the ones listed below, is the best and most common way to diagnose a food allergy. These trials use a ‘novel’ protein source, which is hopefully something completely new to your dog or different from what he has had before. This reduces the chance of an immune response, hopefully eliminating the specific protein causing the allergic reaction.

Hydrolyzed diets, in addition, are created when animal proteins are broken down into much smaller molecules, making it difficult for the immune system to recognize harmful allergens and drastically reducing the chances of an allergic reaction.

How are Dog Food Allergies Treated?
So, your dog is allergic to a certain ingredient in his food. You certainly don’t want to keep feeding him that food! The first step, and only one needed really, is eliminating that particular ingredient from his food. Since most dog foods are composed of many ingredients, the easiest way to do this is narrowing down those ingredients from many to a few.

Limited Ingredient Dog Food
In order to offer a wide range of nutrients, manufacturers often use many ingredients in their foods. In this case, it can actually be harmful to offer so many- at least until we figure out what the ‘culprit’ is, so you veterinarian might prescribe a ‘Limited Ingredient Dog Food’. These are exactly how they sound, foods with fewer ingredients meant to help treat a dog’s sensitive stomach.

First, your veterinarian will prescribe a certain limited ingredient food. If that doesn’t do the trick, they will switch to an alternate food made from different ingredients, and so on.

There are many limited ingredient foods out there, but most of them are lower quality and cheaply manufactured. Below, we’ve listed five quality names, known for producing good, nutritional dog foods.

Some Limited Ingredient Dog Foods:
Canidae Grain-Free Pure Limited Ingredient Diet
Earthborn Holistic Venture Turkey Meal and Butternut Squash Limited Ingredient Diet
Merrick Limited Ingredient Diet Grain Free Salmon & Sweet Potato
Nulo Freestyle Limited Plus Puppy and Adult Dog Food
Wellness Simple Limited Ingredient Diet

Food Intolerance vs. Food Allergy
When most people think their dog is having an allergic reaction to food, the culprit is actually food intolerance. A food intolerance doesn’t involve an immune response, and doesn’t stimulate histamines. For example, some dogs might be ‘lactose intolerant’, meaning a dog’s body won’t process the lactose found in milk well. Many humans are lactose intolerant also. These intolerances can lead to GI issues.

A study done in 2017 estimated that out of all dogs seeing a veterinarian for any issue, only about 1-2% actually had a food allergy or intolerance. That being said, it isn’t very common. Even then, true food allergies are less common than intolerances.

Meat, dairy and eggs are probably the most common allergens in dog food. It’s usually a protein in these foods that is the problem, not the food itself. In the wild, animal meat makes up most of a dog or wolve’s diet, so you can assume how rare an allergy to it would be.

Conclusion: What to Do?
You see your dog itching constantly, acting strange; his behavior is actually starting to change. What should you do if you think your pup might have a dog food allergy? Bring your pooch in for an exam, and talk this over with your veterinarian! Your vet has the knowledge and experience needed to develop the absolute best plain of attack for your pet’s ‘itchy issue’!

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Why You Should Buy A Dog Stroller

Having a dog stroller sounded quite weird some years back. Nowadays, dog strollers have gained popularity thanks to the numerous benefits they offer. There are various occasions and situation that make it necessary to use a stroller. They are very effective, convenient and comfortable to your dog. Here are a few reasons to get a stroller.

1, Easier for vet visit
Transporting dogs in a stroller when taking them to the vet, especially small puppies, is convenient and eliminates worries of the puppies escaping. A stroller also protects your dog from picking up germs from the floor or other animals in the waiting room. It’s also comfortable in case your dog is convalescing.

2, Ideal for outings
If you’re going out with friends or family, using a stroller can be convenient. You won’t need to worry about your dog as you have your lunch, go to a concert, or indulge in other fun activities. In such crowded places, you don’t have to worry about your dog getting stepped on or picking dangerous stuff. You can also be able to carry your dog once in a while to the office as the stroller provides a confined place for the dog.

3, Ideal for injured and old dogs
A stroller provides a comfortable ride for old, sick and injured dogs that are too weak to walk. Getting such dogs some fresh air and change of scenery may be refreshing, and that’s where the stroller comes handy. A dog that has undergone surgery may need mental stimulation and physical exercise to recuperate.

4, Protection
There is always the danger of your dog, especially the small ones, being attacked by aggressive dogs. A stroller will also protect your precious pet paws from rough sidewalks and pavements. Some dogs are also susceptible to extreme weather conditions. A stroller will protect your dog from excess heat and snow. It also ideal in urban areas where there is a lot of traffic which can be overwhelming for the dog.

5, Better Exercise
It’s fun when you take your dog along for runs and walks. However, it might be hard for the dog to keep up. Therefore, you can bring along a stroller for the dog to ride in. This way, you still get the most out of your workout without tiring your dog. It’s also a great opportunity to have more quality time with your best friend.

6, Ideal for elderly people
A walk is a great way for elderly people to refresh and exercise. However, for the elderly pet lovers who love to tag their pets along, it might be difficult because the dog that can easily stray. A stroller will help keep the dog restrained.

7, Great or multiple dogs
Walking more than one dog can turn out to be a nightmare. It can be tough to control them as they keep running in every direction during walks. Keeping one or more of the dogs in a stroller can save you from all this trouble and keep your pets safe.

A stroller is a great item for pet owners to invest in. It brings convenience and greater mobility to both you and your buddy. However, with the many options available in the market, you may find it hard determining the best one for your dog. Not sure which one to choose? Check out 8 Best Dog Strollers for 2019 | iPetCompanion.

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How to Make Bathing Your Dog as Easy and Stress-Free as Possible

On television and in the movies, giving a dog a bath looks like a lot of fun. People are always laughing and smiling as their adorable dog sprays suds everywhere and splashes around. In the real world, however, bathing a dog is usually a lot more complicated.

Despite their excellent sense of smell, dogs are completely fine with the idea of roaming around smelling bad, covered in dirt and grime. Most dogs balk at the idea of bathing, doing their best to wriggle away. Even though bath time is usually funny in the movies, it isn’t quite as much fun when you are the one trying to pin down a wet, sudsy dog that is struggling to get away.

Fortunately, there are some ways that you can make bath time a little less stressful – not just for your dog but also for yourself.

Find A Way to Make Bath Time a Positive Experience
Associating something positive with bathing can change the way that your dog views bath time. Most dogs love toys and treats. Make sure you are armed with plenty of treats from Dog Product Picker. A good scratch behind the ears doesn’t hurt anything, either. When dogs learn that good things happen during bath time, they are a lot less likely to put up a fight when you try to give them a bath.

To start helping your dog develop positive feelings about bathing, leave the water out of the equation. Instead, have them get into an empty bathtub. While they are there, give them tasty treats and find some fun toys that they can play with. As they start to adapt to the idea of being in the tub, you can begin to add a small amount of warm water.

It may take a lot of repetition before your dog starts to behave the way that you want them to. For instance, if there is a particular area where you give your dog baths, call them to that area, providing them with a treat whenever they come. Eventually, they will learn to come on command, even if you don’t give them a treat.

Avoid Getting Soap or Water in Their Ears
One of the most important things to avoid when bathing your dog is getting water or soap in their ears. The water can not only annoy your dog but it also can wind up harming their health.

Some dogs will allow you to tuck cotton balls gently under their ears. If your dog won’t tolerate that, however, you will just need to use caution to keep from getting water where it shouldn’t be.

Train Your Dog from An Early Age
The best time to start giving your dog baths is while they are still young. Puppies are a lot more open to the idea of bathing. The sooner you start getting on a regular bathing routine, the more likely your dog is to do well with baths later in life.

Choose A Shampoo That Is Formulated for Dogs
Using the wrong shampoo can leave your dog feeling itchy and uncomfortable. Harsh shampoos can strip the moisture from their skin, leaving it dry and flaky. Choose a mild shampoo that is formulated for dogs. That way, you can get your dog clean without washing away their skin’s natural oil. Ask your vet for recommendations when it comes to choosing a shampoo.

Start at The Neck
To avoid getting soap or water in your dog’s mouth, eyes, or nose, start washing at their neck and work your way down. This can be done with a cup filled with water or with a spray nozzle. They even make special sprayers that are made expressly for giving dogs baths. When it comes to cleaning their head, stick with a damp cloth rather than a bucket or sprayer.

Use the Correct Drying Method
Some people opt for drying their dog out with a hairdryer. However, most dogs balk at the loud noise and strange sensation of having their fur dried. If you do use a hairdryer, set the heat low so that you don’t accidentally burn your dog.

Towel drying your dog is usually a lot less stressful, even though it doesn’t get them quite as dry. Stores that sell pet products usually carry special dog drying towels that are designed to be extremely absorbent. Remember, as well, that your dog will most likely shake when they get out of the tub. Try to protect the area from flying water droplets ahead of time.

Turning bath time into a positive experience can benefit both you and your dog. When giving your dog a bath, maintain a relaxed demeanor while still letting your dog know that you are in control. Over time, bath time can become a ritual that you both enjoy.

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Why I started the ‘Respect the lead campaign’

I was out walking with my family and my dog over New year at a local beauty spot. Towards the end of our walk I heard a dog fight close by, there were screams of ‘help’ and so my veterinary mode kicked in and I found myself running over.

Just as I got to the gathering crowd someone threw something towards the dogs which momentarily distracted them and they came apart. I checked over one of the dogs whilst the other dog was led away by its upset owner. The first dog was fine however a comment about blood alerted me to the fact that the other dogs owner had a nasty bite to his hand. By this time there were quite a few strong words exchanged and so I walked away.

I wanted to check the other dog & owner and finally found them in the car park. Fortunately both dogs were unscathed but sadly the owner had a deep bite that needed urgent medical attention. I gave some human first aid advice and had a long chat with them about the incident. They were very upset as they had been walking their reactive dog on a lead and when it had been approached by a very enthusiastic bouncy young dog they had requested it was taken away. Sadly this was ignored and after about the 10th time of asking their dog reacted and so a fight broke out. As I walked away I felt sad for the owner, disappointed that they were doing the ‘right thing’ by keeping their dog on a lead and warning others to stay away…yet still their requests were ignored.

My own current dog had issues when I first rescued him and I spent a lot of time training him to be calmer and accepting of other dogs around him. He does stay on the lead a lot of the time and I too encounter many owners who let their dogs come charging over, fortunately with the groundwork I have put in and the training I continue to take with me on a walk I can deal with it…however many people can’t. As soon as you put a lead on a dog everything changes for them and so we need to respect this, understand why and act accordingly……………..

As the days went on after the incident, I kept thinking about what I had seen and felt passionately that something needed to be done to raise awareness of lead etiquette.

So after a lot of thought, planning and design my ‘Respect the lead’ campaign was born……… It has had amazing coverage on social media and I have had many requests for posters (all over the world!). The support has been overwhelming and I am still to this day amazed at the impact it seems to have made in the dog owning world.

Let’s continue to spread the awareness so that everyone can enjoy their dog walks and together we can help our canine friends ……who may be kept on a lead for a reason.

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Grooming your Puppy for the First Time

All good dog owners know that grooming isn’t just about primping your pet to look cute; it’s also about maintaining good health.

The first time you groom your puppy is an important occasion that requires careful preparation and dedication. Don’t be put off by your inexperience; it’s easy to do once you know how. If you approach the situation armed with good advice and confidence, all will go smoothly for you and your furry friend.

Puppies are obviously going to be more challenging to groom than an older dog, and the first grooming experience is much like a child’s first haircut, i.e. expect some tears and tantrums!

Grooming Preparation:
In the weeks before grooming, concentrate on building a positive relationship with your puppy and ensure he is as comfortable as possible with touch and being handled in anyway. This is probably the most important thing you can do to prepare for grooming. Your aim is to make each session a calming, bonding experience.

You can practice this with positive reinforcement whenever you feed your puppy from your hand; stroke your puppy as it is lying down and gradually teach that being held by you is not dangerous.

Create a friendly environment so that your puppy immediately knows that whatever is about to happen is safe and enjoyable. Show affection with petting and soothing words so that the puppy is relaxed.

Keep your first groom session short, that way the puppy won’t misbehave and when you are ready for a second session, your puppy will be more used to the process and you can gradually go for longer each time.

Keep your puppy loosely restrained so that you can maintain your control without frightening him is also important.

Bath Time
Begin with a nice, relaxing bath using puppy shampoo and conditioner. Take care not to get soap in the puppy’s eyes. To really put your dog at ease, you can give it a massage as you work your way lathering down the back towards the tail and back legs.

Brushing
For the first session keep the brushing to a minimum. Be aware that any brushes, clippers and tools might alarm the puppy so show each brush or comb to the pup first before giving a treat as a reward. Do this a few times before then giving the puppy a few short strokes with the item. Be mindful of sensitive areas at first like inner legs and tail.

Clipping
Remember that clipping your dog’s claws is not the same as trimming your own nails. Cut at a 45-degree angle so as to avoid trimming the blood vessel that runs into the nail (which will be a painful experience for your dog if it gets cut by mistake!). You need to only cut the part of the nail that extends beyond this blood vessel known as a ‘quick.’

If unsure about clipping claws you should seek advice from a vet beforehand.

Grooming sessions at first should be short but done fairly often so that your puppy becomes accustomed to them and learns to associate them as just another fun activity to share with you.

Ruff Guide to a Dog Friendly Home

The silly grin and gentle tail wag from our furry friends never fail to brighten our day. Not only do dogs make excellent house pets, but they are also proven to make our lives happier. After all, all they do is makes us laugh and smile (except of course if they get a poop or pee accident!).

However, it’s not all about them making us happy, because we, as responsible dog owners should also bring back the favor to them. There are lots of ways you can do that, one of which is by making your home as dog-friendly as possible.

Let them roam freely and safely inside your house and backyard and giving them quick access to essentials like food and water goes a long way for your canine buddies. You can also give them toys to play on so that they won’t get bored and be destructive.

It’s all about ensuring that they stay healthy, both physically and emotionally. And take note, dogs have feelings too!

Well, some of you might think that having a dog is a walk-in-the-park — but it’s not.

It’s just like raising a child, except for the fact that it’s harder! But then again, it’s not a big problem because we’re going to help you become a responsible dog owner. As long as you love what you’re doing and you know what to do, then you’re on your way to raising your “super dog”.

Want to know more? If so, then scroll down to check out this creatively informative graphic from AXA. It’s a life saver!

Ruff Guide to a Dog Friendly Home

Is pet hair bad for your health?

Pet allergies explained
People with pet allergies are allergic to certain proteins found in dander, urine, feces, and saliva in common household animals, such as dogs and cats. The compromised immune system of those people leads to the release of IgE antigens (a type of protein) that attaches to the lining of the respiratory tract, skin, and eyes.

Furthermore, this will produce chemical reactions that result in inflammation and common allergy symptoms, including: wheezing, coughing, constricted airways, runny or congested nose, itchy throat, and watery and itchy eyes.

Pet allergiesAre pet allergies linked to asthma?
There is still a wide breadth of unexplained phenomenon between allergies and asthma in general. Not everything is known but it is assumed that chronic inflammation (from pet allergies, for example) can potentially lead to the development of asthma later on.

However, it is not a clean-cut piece of information and remains as a possible theory amongst a batch of contradicting information.

Can pets prevent allergies?
It is thought that early exposure to pet allergens can help reduce the risk of pet allergies in the future. Having a pet cat before the age of 18 can help decrease cat allergies while exposure before the age of one (in boys) to a pet dog can also do the same.

The possibility is there but further research is necessary to firmly confirm preliminary studies. Most will agree though that a bit of germs (and allergens) to boost immune systems may be quite helpful in the long run.

Can pets prevent allergies

How do I know if I have pet allergies?
You may start suspecting pet allergies if you suffer from any of the previously mentioned symptoms while being around animals. You may also notice that those symptoms are gone or find relief soon after avoiding contact from pets.

The only real medical way of knowing what you are allergic to is by having an allergy test done. It is recommended that this test be done as soon as symptoms are bothersome in order to prevent chronic inflammation (and thereby, asthma or asthma attacks).

Treatment plan for pet allergies
The best treatment plan for pet allergies is removing the pet and avoiding them in future situations. If you are a big animal lover and insist on having a pet in the house, ignoring your allergies, then you can take other precautionary steps to help ease symptoms.

The most important is not allowing pets to sleep in your bedroom, and especially not in your bed. Keep the bedroom door closed at all times to avoid their unwanted proteins from contaminating your area.

Pet hair and other substances will get transferred anywhere so it is important to remove upholstery (or clean it daily) and/or prevent pets from getting on them. Your pets will have to undergo a proper bath at least every week to keep potential allergens at bay. Another option can be the use of special air filters to reduce airborne allergens.

An easy but non-natural solution can also be prescribed medication. Certain medications will help prevent allergy symptoms or asthma attacks, such as antihistamines. If you happen to have any type of allergy, it is always wise to work with your medical physician and come up with an effective treatment plan together accordingly.

Treatment plan for pet allergies

Does ingested pet hair cause health issues?
Contrary to popular belief, ingested pet hair does not cause health issues. Pet hair actually has a similar structure to human hair, being made of mainly keratin, which cannot be digested by the human body.

Rumor has it that pet hair may travel to other organs but this is simply not true. Someone will have to ingest plenty of pet hair in order for health issues to develop and this highly unlikely.

Should I consider having a pet?
The benefits of having a pet far outweigh the possible side effects in most cases. It has been scientifically proven that pets bring comfort, help heal, and increase happiness in owners. They are a wonderful addition to any family and can contribute to a person’s overall wellbeing.

However, if you already suffer from pet allergies and your symptoms are uncontrollable, it might be best to not own any four-legged creatures. At the end of day, it is a personal decision (based on many factors, excluding health reasons) that will ultimately decide this answer.

Is Apple Cider Vinegar Harmful to Dogs?

Apple cider vinegar is a type of vinegar that is manufactured from the fermentation of apple cider. It involves the breakdown of sugars in food substances using yeast and bacteria. The process starts with the conversion of sugars to alcohol and then the solution is fermented further to vinegar.

Over the years, most people believe that apple cider vinegar is rich with enzymes and nutrients that are fundamentally important to humans. But the question is: are these properties also beneficial to dogs?

Let’s start by saying that apple cider vinegar isn’t harmful to your dog. To give you a better understanding, we are going to discuss the various ways through which apple cider vinegar might actually be an excellent addition to your dog’s cleaning and feeding routines.

Why is Apple Cider Vinegar Beneficial to Dogs?
Research has shown that apple cider vinegar has a couple of nutritional and health benefits to your dog. Below are some of them;

1. Improves the Digestion of Your Dog
The first question that runs through your mind is; can my dog consume apple cider vinegar? Will it harm my dog? Well, ACV might be safe for consumption by the dog but you really need to be careful with the amounts you administer.

The natural ingredients in apple cider vinegar will improve the digestion of your pooch by reducing bloating or gas, but it’s advisable to give her the ACV in controlled amounts. That is because too much of the ACV will lead to stomach upsets and other related health complications.

All in all, ACV is great addition for dogs suffering from diarrhea or constipation. But you should note that a portion of plain apple cider vinegar will be as uncomfortable to dogs as it is to humans. In that case, you should add a few drops of this ingredient to water before giving it to your dog. It’s also best that you look for raw apple cider vinegar than the commercial produced one for better results.

2. Prevents and Cures UTIs
So far, there has not been any evidence showing apple cider vinegar can cure UTIs. Therefore, I wouldn’t recommend this ingredient as a first resort to any urinary infection in dogs. However, some of the dog owners say that using apple cider vinegar on their dogs on a daily basis has prevented urinary tract infections.

When there is too much alkalinity in the urinary tract, it allows the entry and growth of bacteria. Therefore, it’s only logical that the acidity in the apple cider vinegar will balance out the alkalinity hence reducing the UTI infection. However, before settling for the ACV in treating the unrinary tract infections, please contact your vet.

3. Prevents and Cures Ear Infections
Most people use apple cider vinegar to flash out debris out of their dog’s ear. During summer, your dog is likely to get a brown sludge or debris stuck out in her ears especially after a long day in the pool or the sea swimming and diving. However, with apple cider vinegar, you can take care of such an infection easily.

You only need to dip a piece of cloth in a solution of ACV and plenty of water. But before use, you should consult with your vet because if her ears have any open wounds or any bleeding, the use of apple cider vinegar might worsen the state. Also, you should monitor your dog closely after every use. In case you notice that she is excessively scratching her ears, you should stop using the apple cider vinegar immediately.

4. Clears Any Yeast Infections
Malassezia primarily causes yeast infections on the skin or gut of your animal. The immune system of your pooch is always alert and keeps the numbers of this fungus in check. However, the stress in her immune system might at times be too much, and causing the fungus to overgrow.

In that case, you will need an additional treatment in order to reduce the numbers of the fungi. Yeast infection causes irritation of the skin, constant licking on the affected areas, smelly skin, foul-smelling discharge from the ears and head-shaking among other symptoms. All these symptoms will make your pooch really uncomfortable.

Fortunately, apple cider vinegar can get rid of the yeast infections completely after a few uses. But, as I keep on insisting, you should consult with your vet before choosing this type of remedy.

5. Eases Pain in the Joints
Apple cider vinegar is also a good home remedy for joint pains which are majorly caused by arthritis. Arthritis is a disease that is caused by deposition of calcium in the joints especially when your dog is getting older. These calcium deposits may cause stiffness as well as discomfort to your dog.

When your dog ingests apple cider vinegar, it will help her breakdown the calcium deposits hence relieving the pain and discomfort. If you add apple cider vinegar in your dog’s water, remember to measure one teaspoon for every 50 pounds of your dog’s weight.

More to that, always avail plain water next to the water with apple cider vinegar. That is because dogs may drink less water when it is mixed with ACV. The plain water will help prevent dehydration and ease the burning sensation from the ACV.

Precautions and How to Administer Apple Cider Vinegar to Your Dog
As you have figured by now, not all vinegars are good for your dog’s health. Don’t use any clear vinegar from the supermarket since they are considered ‘dead’. That means the vinegar doesn’t contain any enzymes and any other ingredients found in the raw apple cider vinegar. Therefore you might end up doing more harm than good to your dog.
The best vinegar is the raw apple cider vinegar. You can either use it to rinse your dog’s ears in case of an ear infection, spray where she sleeps to get rid of fleas or simply mix it in her drinking water to help with ingestion problems.

You can also mix the apple cider vinegar with honey if you plan on adding it in your dog’s drinking water in the bowl.

That way, she will take the water with much ease and heal any of her joint problems quickly. It is important to consult first with your vet so that you know whether of or not apple cider vinegar is safe for your dog.

Kyra pets

How to Find Best Pet Insurance For your Pet and What Should You Know Before Buying?

When we adopt a pet, we know for the matter of fact that it is going to end with us having to say goodbye, but we still do it. And we do it for a very good reason: They bring happiness and joy and optimism. They attack every moment of every day with that attitude.
We find a friend in them and unconditional love. So, to protect these amazing animals in their times of sickness or injury and to give them the best medical aid, it is imperative to avail Pet Insurance.

Pet insurance

What do pet insurances do?
The first question comes on our mind Is Pet insurance necessary? The Pet insurance schemes cover all veterinary expenses incurred for the treatment of a pet who has suffered an injury or is sick. Some pet insurance plans along with death cover also cover the loss of the pet that is insured. These benefits help pet owners to eliminate the risk of high expenditures on medical treatment of the pet and protect its valuable life by giving the best treatment.

Features and Benefits of a good Pet Insurance:
Customized plans – Pet insurance plans are customizable according to the needs and available for pets such as dogs, cats, rabbits, birds, etc. Know here how to find an insurance company.

Sum Assured – Generally, the sum assured on pet insurance products, varies from £500 to £750. This depends on the factors like the breed of the pet and other related considerations.

Add-On Cover – Some insurance providers like Future Generali insurance offer add-on benefits and covers as well for the base policy, such as loss of show entry fee. This cover is meant to offer for the forfeit of entry fee when the pet cannot make it to the show due to an injury or sickness.

Third Party Liability – Third party liability cover is also offered by some pet insurance policies, in the unlikely event that your pet attacks a third party and causes any damage to third party property.

Types of Cover – There are three major types of pet insurance cover.

Lifetime cover
Time-limited cover
Money-limit cover

What does pet insurance cover?
These policies cover the following
Accidental Death
Illness contracted or injury suffered while the policy is in effect
Full Treatment expenses of the pet.
An accident of the pet insured while in transit via rail, air or road.
Loss or theft of the pet insured
Incapacitation
Accidental poisoning
Any Third Party Liability

Factors considered in Calculations of premiums for Pet insurances:
Age of animal
The breed and type of animals
Health condition of the animal
Exotic animals will have a higher premium rate
The location of your house and the prevailing climatic conditions

A good pet insurance covers pet’s treatment at the vet, covers the vaccinations that need to be given to the pets for protection, the life cover of the pet.
Home is not a home without a pet. So, ensure your happiness with pet insurance.

5 Most Common Dog Health Issues To Be Aware Of

When you take care of your dog, you are rewarded with friendship, loyalty and unconditional love. As well as ensuring they are well fed and exercised; it also involves safety when handling and housing them, but also carefully monitoring their health over time.
However, it is not always easy as it can be stressful when your dog is ill and suffering. To help give you a greater understanding of what is happening, there are five common health issues that you should be aware of.

Diarrhea
Although it is not a disease, diarrhea is more a symptom of an underlying condition. This could be something very short term and acute and related to their diet. It is likely to pass by quickly.
You need to look our for other symptoms though, such as vomiting or if they are feel uneasy, lethargic and have lost their appetite.
Diarrhea could be a sign of a more serious illness. Look out for recurrences and make water readily available. If the diarrhea doesn’t pass and your dog shows signs of other symptoms, it could be a move serious condition. In this situation, take them to your local vet.

dog ear cleaner

Ear Infections
Your dog may have an ear infection if they are shaking or tilting their head a lot. Another symptom or sign is rubbing or scratching their ear. If you see your dog doing any of these things, take a closer look around their ears for redness, swelling or discharge. Also check for any bad odors and if there is a combination of any of these symptoms, it is possible your dog has an ear infection and needs to take a trip to your vets.
Dogs commonly suffer from ear infections, particularly breeds with ears that flop. As their ear canals are vertical, it makes them much more susceptible to contracting infections, as it makes it east for microorganisms, foreign objects and unclean water getting trapped. All of which can cause infections.
Your vet or animal hospital will need a swab taken from the area and inspect their inner ear. Insecticide, antibiotics and fungicides can be used to treat ear infections, depending on what caused them. You could also make sure that you have some ear dog-ear cleaning products in at home to make sure their ears are always clean.

Fleas
Fleas are incredibly common are very easy to spot. The first thing to look out for is your dog biting, licking or scratching at their coat or skin. If they have an infestation that has gone on for a long time unnoticed, this might become clearer if you notice skin irritation and abrasion signs or the loss of fur. Check your dog’s coat regularly for fleas, looking out for dark droppings and eggs. Around the ears, the neck and tail base are the most common areas.
Vets will provide your dog with an oral treatment if it is a more serious infestation. A simple flea treatment in the form of a liquid can be applied to your dog’s skin, which deters adults from staying on your dog’s body. Along with treating your dog, you need to also think about the environment they live in and if possible, remove or replace bedding and vacuum around the places they frequent, disposing of the dust collected carefully.
After treating your dog’s flea problem, make a habit of using spot-on treatment every 4 to 8 weeks to prevent a recurrence. As flea’s lay eggs that mature, the cycle begins once again, so break this cycle.

Hot Spots
The first sign you may be aware of with hot spots is a small area of irritation in the form of an insect bite. That small issue can become worse if your dog scratches or itches around the offending area.
In time, this can develop into what is known as a hot spot, also referred to as acute moist dermatitis. Hot spots are irritated, moist skin, that can sometimes ooze and cause matted hair. Other causes for hot spots can be something dog’s environment, poor grooming, fleas or allergic reactions. When your dog suffer from this, they will scratch and itch at it until it worsens and causes a more serious irritation of the skin, which can lead to nasty infections if untreated.
Treating hot spots normally involves having your dog’s matted hair clipped, cleaned and dried sufficiently. Then applying a light disinfectant. If there are severe hot spots, cortisone can be applied. Your vet will be able to advise what is the best course of action.

Vomiting
Although if your dog vomits on occasion, this is not anything you should be worried about, especially if they are an otherwise healthy animal. However, if you it appears that your dog is vomiting more often, it is important to be on the lookout for more symptoms of distress and discomfort. It may be that normal dietary issues cause vomiting.
Be sure to look for sings of diarrhoea, blood or any other changes in your dog’s behavior, as these can all be signs of more serious problems. Vomiting is caused by various diseases, toxins and even infections. Therefore, if it persists, it is a good time to visit the vets.

dog health