5 Tips for Travelling with a Dog

Some dogs are born travelers who will happily hike for miles and live for hanging their heads out of car windows. But others are homebodies, for whom traveling can lead to nerves, nausea, boredom, and pent-up energy.

If you’re the owner of a dog who dislikes travel, here are 5 tips to help ease the process of getting them from A to B:

Supplements
Unlike prescription medications, which can be strong and may come with unwanted side effects, natural supplements are a safe, more subtle way to introduce an added layer of calm into travel days.

Many owners find that using supplement products like CBD oil can help dogs deal with discomforts such as anxiety, stress, and nausea – all things that can occur when hitting the road.

Pet CBD is one of the fastest-growing areas in the pet industry, thanks to the products’ anti-inflammatory effect. By binding to receptors that play a role in triggering pain and anxiety responses, CBD helps relax dogs, making them less affected by stress triggers.

Food, water, and bowl
Number one on any dog’s priority list is their food, so it makes sense for owners to also prioritize their pet’s dinners. Keeping a regular supply of your dog’s normal food helps keep things simple, and prevents the stress of trying to find suitable meals wherever you stop.

Owners should always carry a full water bottle for their dogs. But it’s also important to bring a reliable bowl along, too. Often, dogs can struggle to drink and eat from bowls they’re not accustomed to, especially if they’re too steep or shallow to comfortably access what’s inside. For bigger dogs, elevated travel bowls are available from specialist pet suppliers

Other doggo travel essentials include treats, poop bags, their leash, and any medications they might use.

Creating the right environment
A crate is a tried-and-tested solution for keeping dogs calm and contained – two things that are especially important when travelling.

Depending on your mode of transport, you’ll want your crate to look a little different. But no matter the design, crates should be big enough for dogs to stand, turn around, and comfortably lie down. Adequate ventilation is also key.

For smaller dogs and shorter time periods, more potable carriers are great options. Doggy backpacks can work well when hiking or walking long distances.

Once you arrive at your destination, there’s still work to do to create the right environment for a dog. Ideally, owners should confirm beforehand whether a destination is dog friendly, but regardless, it’s always a good idea to make your own judgment on whether a space is safe for your pet.

Many hotel chains will charge extra fees for staying with dogs in tow. Make yourself aware of these and consider looking for hotels that pets without additional fees, no deposits, and no one-time charges.

Home comforts
Bringing along a few key items from your home can help dogs feel more comfortable when travelling. A familiar toy, for example, eases the transition from a well-known environment into an unknown space.

Inside their crate or travel space, also make sure to add a comfortable blanket that can provide warmth if necessary. Using a blanket from home introduces familiar smells, which should have a calming effect for most dogs.

Favorite treats can be a lifesaver, providing distractions and incentives to help guide dogs through the traveling experience.

Some owners even bring along different ‘levels’ of treats, with more everyday snacks acting as a standard reward, while saving a special variety for times when a stronger incentive is needed.

ID
Alongside those items needed to make your dog as comfortable as possible, it’s important to also think about the things necessary for ensuring your trip itself is a seamless experience.

When traveling with a dog – especially when traveling across borders – a variety of different types of paperwork may be required. From pet passports to insurance to health records, every country has its own specific requirements for pet entry, so make sure you do your research.

ID is also important for making sure that your pet can be identified in the event that they get lost. Owners should remember that dogs may be both unfamiliar with their surroundings and curious about new sights and smells when traveling, which increases the risk of them becoming disorientated or wandering off.

If you are separated from your dog when traveling, knowing that they can be quickly and easily identified should help provide at least a little peace of mind.

Always make sure your dog id where a collar that contains an ID tag with your name and international phone number. ID microchipping is also worth considering, as these can often be read by practices in other countries.

If you have a lot of paperwork to handle, try making digital copies of each document and storing them on your phone. That way, everything remains easily accessible why the hard copies can stay safely together in one place.

Article Supplied

Innovation centre help Harry to throw a ball for his dog

Cerebra Innovation Centre, with help from ATiC – the University’s integrated research centre – developed the tennis ball shooter for Harry Flynn, 11, to help him bond with his dog Addi.

Eleven-year-old Harry has Athetoid Cerebral Palsy, which sadly means he has poor gross motor skills and is reliant on his wheelchair just to get around. Harry faces difficult challenges everyday but he’s able to live a happy life. He’s a budding musician and enjoys going to the cinema but when someone special came into his life two years ago, Harry soon had a new love. That someone was Addi, Harry’s assistance dog and best friend!

Addi, who came from the charity Dogs for Good, has been with Harry for two years. “He helps Harry by doing things like opening doors, opening drawers, turning light switches on and helping to remove socks and coats,” said Harry’s mum Hilary. “Most importantly he’s a constant friend and he encourages him to go outside, which, prior to having Addi, he never liked doing.

Addi’s a remarkable dog and a big part of Harry’s life. When he isn’t assisting, it’s important for Addi to have play time and they both love being outside together. Each time they were out on walks though, there was just something missing and Harry’s parents tried but couldn’t find the answer.

Harry’s mum, Hilary told us, “Harry so wanted to play fetch with Addi, who just loves to run after a ball. Sadly, though, Harry doesn’t have the strength or coordination to be able to throw. He loved being outside with Addi but you could see the disappointment on his face each time we went for a walk. I was so pleased, though, when I came across Cerebra and their wonderful Innovation Centre.”

The Cerebra Innovation Centre is home to a team of product designers and is based within UWTSD’s Swansea College of Art. The teams designs and builds innovative, bespoke products to help disabled children to discover the world around them. The products the team designs are desirable and exciting as well as functional, promoting social inclusion and peer acceptance for the children they help.

The team designed a bracket that could support the launcher and sit nicely on Harry’s wheelchair frame – not only that but the launcher’s firing mechanism had to be altered, so that all Harry had to do was lightly press it to release the ball.

Once the bracket was in place there was just one more surprise in store … putting Harry at the controls! While he could fire the launcher with no problem, Harry had to move his wheelchair each time he wanted to aim. The wheelchair had joystick controls so the team also added joystick controls to the launcher. Harry is now able to enjoy play time with Addi, repaying him for the assistance he gives on a daily basis. “He’s been a real help in my life;· said Harry.

The Innovation Centre is part of Cerebra, a charity supporting families who have a child with a brain condition, worked with ATiC, an integrated research centre at the university, to design and 3D print parts that make it possible for Harry to fire the shooter, and a joystick that enables him to point and aim the shooter.

Article Supplied

3 New Ways to Relieve Your Dog’s Anxiety

If you think that your dog may be suffering from anxiety, it is important to look for signs in their behaviour. If they bark or howl when no one is home, pant or pace a lot, shiver or shake, hide in corners and under furniture, or destroy furniture like your chesterfield, they likely have anxiety.

It is important to seek professional help from your V.E.T. to improve their quality of life. They can determine if their anxiety-behaviour is due to medical factors, but can also recommend ways to lower their stress. You can also see a pet behaviour counsellor for advice, to train them in ways that can reduce anxiety when they are facing their triggers. Here are three common ideas that V.E.T.s and pet behaviour counsellors recommend for reducing anxiety in dogs.

Anxiety Wrap
Anxiety wraps uses a similar principle as is used on humans. When applying gentle but firm and consistent pressure to the torso, it can have a calming effect. It’s similar to how infants feel calmer when swaddled in blankets, or weighted blankets help people calm down when trying to sleep. ThunderShirt is the most well-known anxiety vest for pets that you can find. You can get them for dogs and cats in different sizes. When worn properly, in the right size, these wraps distribute pressure along the back and torso of your pet like a constant hug. This pressure releases endorphin hormones, which has a calming and happy effect.

Noise Distraction
You can use noise to distract your pet from their source of anxiety. This is more effective for anxiety caused by sudden loud noises, like thunder or fireworks, or when you’re watching a game of footy and suddenly cheer or cry out loud in front of them. Noise distraction can also be used to distract them from separation anxiety when you leave for work for the day.

It either drowns out the sound causing their anxiety or just gives them something else more calming that they can focus on instead. You can do something as simple as playing music or sounds that are pleasing to animals, like birds chirping or running water, or you can get special sound devices that use white noise machines to drown out other external sounds.

The sound frequencies emitted by white noise machines are specifically made to drown out other noise, including fireworks and thunder. They are even more effective if you have them somewhere more insulated from other noise, like an enclosed crate or bedroom.

CBD Treats and Supplements
CBD, or cannabidiol, is a health supplement that is becoming increasingly popular, both for humans and pets. It’s relatively new, so while research has confirmed that CBD can help relieve anxiety, it isn’t fully clear how it achieves this, and there is even less research on how it works on animals.

Despite this, CBD is a safe supplement to take for pets. It has a relatively low risk of side effects, and the side effects are minor. There is added risk if you have CBD that includes THC, which can be toxic to animals, so make sure you get good quality CBD treats from places like Joy Organics that are made specifically for pets. You can also look into other supplements, like calming treats, which may be available at your local Tesco in the same aisle with pet food.

With these three tips, you have new ways to help your anxious pet. The good thing about them is that you can try them individually, or use them all together. If you have an extremely anxious pet, you may find that putting them in a thunder shirt, giving them a CBD treat, and keeping them in an enclosed bedroom with a white noise machine running can have dramatic results.

Article Supplied

Do English Bulldogs Make Great Pets?

Without a doubt, the answer to this question is a resounding yes. But, it’s essential that you carefully consider your lifestyle and whether you can offer the best possible home to an English Bulldog. Just like all breeds of dogs, these guys have their own unique requirements, and when they’re not met, then you could be in for a whole heap of trouble. Specialist sites such as https://bulldogpapa.com can be invaluable in those early days of research.

To help your decision-making process, here’s our guide to help you consider if you’re ready for an English Bulldog to join your home.

The English Bulldog Temperament
The well-bred Bulldog will have a kind temperament. They don’t go looking for trouble, but should it turn up, then they are courageous and tenacious. This is the type of dog who should be able to socialize with other dogs and people without a problem.

When you visit your puppy’s breeder, make sure that you get to meet Mum and, ideally, other relatives before your commit to taking on one of the litter. Think about how easy-going and friendly they are because this will tell you a lot about the likely temperament of your pup.

Do be aware, though, that having a well-mannered Bulldog isn’t just about their genes. It’s also about the time and effort that the breeder and the owner put into socializing and training the young dog, but more about that later!

History of the English Bulldog
If you know anything about this breed’s background, you might be wondering just what type of dog you end up living with! That’s because the English Bulldog was initially bred for the gruesome sport of bull-baiting. A pack of dogs would be set on the bull while those watching would bet on the outcome.

Thankfully the sport was banned in the 1800s, and then dedicated breeders started the task of re-establishing the breed with the sweet temperament that the English Bulldog is now well known for.

How Healthy Are English Bulldogs?
Few breeds are without the potential for some health problems, a bit like us humans! But you can reduce the possibility of your Bulldog having genetic health problems by ensuring that the parents are health tested before the breeding takes place.

For Bulldogs in the US, there are a number of tests that the breed club recommends, and these include:

Hip Dysplasia Assessment
This condition prevents the ball of the hip joint from sitting correctly in the socket. It can mean that your Bulldog experiences pain when walking and may become lame.

Cardiac Exam
Bulldogs can be prone to several different diseases of the heart. The cardiac exam involves the vet listening for heart murmurs or an irregular heart rhythm, which may then need an ECG or X-ray to investigate any problems.

Eye Problems
Sadly, Bulldogs can inherit a number of different eye conditions, so it’s essential that the parents have regular eye exams to ensure that these are not passed down to their pups.

How Long Do Bulldogs Live?
On average, an English Bulldog will be with you for between 8-10 years. Now, other bull breeds do live longer. The life expectancy of a French Bulldog, for example, is 10-12 years, and it’s 12-14 years for the Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

So, if the length of time that your Bull breed is with you is a deciding factor, then you might want to widen your search.

Raising an English Bulldog Puppy
Those first few months of your Bulldog’s life are critical in them becoming well-behaved pets that can accompany you anywhere. Just as with all dog breeds, it’s essential that they get out and see the world at a young age.

However, care is needed to ensure that interactions with people, dogs, and other animals are positive. So, remember to be your Bulldog’s advocate and remove him from any situations which they might find to be overwhelming.

Training an English Bulldog Puppy
Now while this may not seem to be the obvious breed to go for if you have aspirations in dog sports, the English Bulldog is very capable of learning a whole range of behaviours. Make it fun, train in short sessions, and use tempting treats and toys to encourage that learning to take place.

All dogs should know how to walk nicely on the leash and come when called. With the Bulldogs’ strength, walks are going to be no fun at all if they’re pulling on the leash. When your dog can walk nicely when out and about, then going out for exercise will be a much more pleasurable experience.

Exercise Requirements
All dogs need the opportunity to get out and about every day. Exercise helps to ensure that your Bulldog doesn’t become overweight, which can be a problem within the breed.

The other key benefit of daily walks is the opportunity for enrichment. This means that your Bulldog gets the chance to sniff new smells, meet new people and see the outside world. All of these things will also help to tire him out, meaning that he will settle down for a snooze once you get home.

Article Supplied

Signs That Your Dog Has an Ear Infection

Ear infections among dogs are quite common. Since they’re always outdoors and love playing around, they could get easily infected. It can happen while they dip their bodies in the pool or spend the entire day in a park. Therefore, it’s important to look for the signs of ear infection.

Some of them are simple issues that might go away soon. Others are more severe and could damage the dog’s central nervous system. These are the signs of an ear infection that require immediate action.

Redness and inflammation. Check if there’s a sudden difference in the ear colour of your dog. If there’s redness or inflammation, it’s a sign of an infection. It might be somewhat challenging for hairy dogs, though. Therefore, you always need to check the ears to see if there’s inflammation.

A sweet or pungent smell. You usually groom your dogs to prevent them from smelling bad. If you still smell a foul odour while playing with your dog, it could be due to an ear infection. It’s a natural reaction to the problem.
Ear canal discharge. Ear infections may also manifest through a discharge. It’s often waxy and rust-like in colour. It helps to observe these changes more often.

Difficulty in chewing. Your dog shouldn’t have a problem chewing foods, especially if they’re soft enough. If you notice that there are issues when chewing, it could be due to an ear infection. If the bowl is no longer empty after eating, and it happens regularly, you have to take action.

Constant rubbing of the head. It’s natural for dogs to keep scratching their heads. It’s their way of removing an irritant. However, if it happens constantly, there could be something wrong. It’s even worse when you see your dog scratching its head on furniture and other rough surfaces. It means that the ear infection is getting worse.

Do something before it’s too late
Dogs with ear infections might manifest more terrible symptoms in the future. They might have difficulty walking due to the loss of balance. They might also find it difficult to eat their food, and it leads to drastic weight loss. The point is that you have to do something before it’s too late. When the ear infection already starts to affect the central nervous system, death might be inevitable.

The problem is that you might not have a local veterinarian to run to. The good thing is that there are home remedies that you can apply to stop the infection. Green tea and oregano are among the natural options to solve an ear infection. Apply them to the affected area until the problem is over. You can also check out https://careyourdog.com/best-home-remedy-for-dog-ear-infection for more information about treating ear infections. If the problem persists, it might be time to look for a veterinarian.

You can’t ignore this problem even if you think it’s natural. Try to be more observant with the changes in your dog. Find a way to deal with it before it’s too late.

Article Supplied

Changing A Pet’s Life : Why You Should Consider Adopting Your Next Dog

By the time this Sunday the 24th of January comes around, many of us will be feeling tired of 2021 already. Those “new year, new you” resolutions are quickly wearing thin and the government’s latest lockdown laws are leaving us all lonelier than ever at this time of year. But what if there was something you could do that really would transform your life for the better? And what if that action could turn another life around too? That’s why this Sunday, on National Change A Pet’s Life Day, you should consider adopting your next dog and we’re here to explain why.

Happy little orange havanese puppy dog is sitting in the grass

Every year, over six hundred million strays are reported across the world, and while we might see ourselves as a nation of dog-lovers, the UK still contributes heavily to that number. Some rescue centers in the UK such as London’s Battersea Dog’s Home rescue as many as thirteen dogs a day, three hundred and sixty five days of the year. It’s an unlucky number, but for those thirteen dogs, getting rescued that day is the luckiest thing that will ever happen to them. Without the constant work that such animal shelters put in with the help of thousands of volunteers, many of these innocent animals would not survive. And yet, these millions of unwanted dogs have so much to offer us!

Much like us humans, our canine friends love to feel loved and without a partner in crime to share life’s ups and downs with, they naturally suffer from loneliness like we do. It’s a beautiful thing to witness a depressed dog without a home flourish into such a joyous bundle of affection once they are given a chance to give their love to somebody.

ilst giving one of these lonely dogs a home is obviously a huge commitment that should never be undertaken lightly, adoption is a two way street. We know that from personal experience with many of our clients, in saving a dog, they have saved themselves and now more than ever, we all do need a little bit of saving.

That dogs have helped so many humans through depression, turmoil and grief when traditional techniques such as anti-depressants and cognitive therapy have all failed, is not surprising. It is no secret that owning a dog is one of the best things you can do for your mental health, and there are scientific studies to prove it. The unconditional love and companionship that dogs offer means that most of our owners regard their pooch as their best friend. This is a best friend whose constant enthusiasm for cuddles and play, for a healthy exercise routine and for social interaction makes it almost impossible to be sad. However, making the choice to adopt a rescue dog rather than buy a “new” dog from a breeder is what really counts in making this kind of relationship truly rewarding. When you offer a dog a second chance, you embark on a healing journey together, providing each other with a daily purpose to keep on smiling and wagging through the darkest of times.

Though people often worry that developing a bond with a rescue dog will be difficult, it is precisely this process that makes that bond so much more meaningful. It may take a little patience, but seeing your dog’s confidence go from strength to strength as they put their trust in you is an unforgettable feeling that will make every second of work you put in worthwhile. Rescue centers will do their utmost to smooth this journey for you. One of the best things about taking on an older dog is that their personality is already developed and they are often also already very well trained. This makes it so much easier for staff to help you find the right dog for you. Time will be invested by the handlers who know the dog best considering your lifestyle and your character which will then be carefully matched to the dog who would be best suited to you. When you do find your perfect furry companion, those same handlers will ensure that your transition is gentle and that you are furnished with as much advice and support as you need.

Contrary to popular belief, adopted dogs are also usually much healthier than pedigree or farmed puppies can be, which can arrive with underlying conditions caused by inbreeding or poor care. Comparatively, rescue centers (as charities rather than businesses out to make profits from their dogs) make sure that all their strays are thoroughly vetted on arrival and where necessary are nursed back to full health before being re-homed. Any unwanted puppies that they take in will always be kept until they are old enough to be weaned and they also make sure that each pet gets neutered, micro-chipped, vaccinated and treated for fleas before leaving. This is all done in an effort to ensure that re-homed dogs are re-homed for life, and the sad cycle of abandonment and stray animals being born on the streets is broken for good.

The trials of 2020 have forced many of us to re-evaluate our lives and here, we honestly believe that can be turned into a positive. If you have more time at home, and less time with your loved ones, the decision to spend that time getting to know a dog who deserves it can hardly be a choice you will regret. When you save a rescue dog, you not only save yourself, but you are also creating a space at the refuge for another dog to be brought in. Your adoption fee will go towards caring for these abandoned animals while they wait patiently for their forever home to come and find them.

Article supplied by
www.peak-pets.com
Shop a wide range of pet vitamins and supplements at Peak Pets

Are dog ramps worth it?

If you are the owner of a dog, you’ve probably thought more than once – and not having to help my dog get on the bed or get in the car every time. If you are still planning to add a four-legged friend to your family, you will definitely think about it in the future. However, there is a very simple way to solve this problem. You just need a dog ramp that will make your dog’s life easier. And yours as well.

What is a dog ramp? It is a surface that helps your pet to get from one level to another. For example, to get easily from floor to bed, sofa, etc. They can come in a variety of sizes, including ones that can be height-adjusted as needed. They are usually made of plastic or wood, it can be decorated and adapted to the interior of your home.

What is it for? Dog ramps are very useful for those who raise small puppies or have senior dogs. Also for those whose dogs are sick, have joint problems, or are handicapped. The dog ramp allows the dog to be independent as well as risk-free as they do not need to try to jump on a higher surface. Because dogs are underestimating their chances of jumping can get injured very often. And such a situation will cause a lot of discomfort for both you and your dog, after which you will still probably have to buy a dog ramp.

The main benefits of having a dog ramp. It will make the dog’s life easier and protect it from possible injuries. Meanwhile, purchasing a dog ramp will also save you a lot of time, as you will no longer need to help your dog every single time it wants to get on the bed or couch. Also, it is not a short-term investment. This tool will be used by your dog constantly for many years.

The main drawback may be beneficial as well. Reduced space in a room is probably the biggest drawback of having dog ramps. However, if the amount of space is relevant to you, you can choose a functional ramp. For example, the one that is easy to fold. Such a ramp will take up very little space and fit perfectly in the closet or under the bed. Another option is to choose a dog ramp that can be used as a shelf or storage box. In this way, space will be used functionally.

So, are dog ramps worth it? The answer is – definitely yes. Some people doubt purchasing a dog ramp because of financial reasons or they are unsure how it would look in their apartment. However, deciding to postpone getting off a dog ramp often means paying a few times more to the vet after a pet has failed an attempt to jump on the bed. Meanwhile, in terms of design, you can definitely find something to suit your interior and be functional as well.

Article Supplied

Top Most Common Illnesses and Diseases in Dogs

There are many illnesses that can befall our precious pets, some curable, some not. Sadly, some of the most common diseases are eminently preventable if dog owners would just be more responsible about vaccinating their dogs.

There are too many cases where puppies are given “free to a good home,” but then these puppies are not vaccinated or dewormed, leading to diseases. There are also diseases that are more incidental and that loving, caring pet owners could not have prevented. So, what are the most common diseases in dogs?

Hip Dysplasia
Hip dysplasia is a genetic condition that, while more prevalent in larger breeds, has been seen in smaller breeds too. It is caused when the ball of the hip joint, or the head of the femur, does not develop at the same pace as the socket. This can lead to the ball being too small, causing the hip to dislocate from time to time and causing pain and lameness in the dog.

Alternatively, the ball can also be too large for the socket, causing the bones to grind together, causing inflammation, pain and, ultimately, arthritis. The disease is not preventable, but you would do well to research the breeder if you are purchasing a breed prone to this condition.

Some indiscriminate breeders exacerbate the problem by inbreeding to get a more “desirable looking” pup, with no regard to the detrimental effect on the pup’s health. There are interventions and treatments to slow the progression of this condition, making your dog more comfortable. Given its seriousness, you certainly need to learn more about hip dysplasia in dogs.

Parvovirus
This is a completely preventable disease that is prevented by simply vaccinating your puppy; however, failure to do so can lead to your dog contracting the virus that is, in most cases, fatal. It is spread in an infected dog’s feces and once infected, your dog will develop diarrhea and vomiting, making him weak and lethargic as he becomes more and more dehydrated. Many dogs succumb to this disease, which is prevented by timeous vaccinations.

Rabies
Another completely preventable disease, Rabies is always fatal for dogs once they have been bitten by an infected creature (it can infect any species, including squirrels, raccoons, rats etc.). Rabies causes paralysis of the throat and tongue, causing the dog to salivate excessively due to his inability to swallow.

As it advances, he may become aggressive and, if he bites, the infection will be spread – even to humans, who must have a course of shots as soon as possible to prevent their own demise. Rabies shots are easily available and every dog owner should ensure to have their dogs vaccinated.

Lyme Disease
This tick-borne disease can be prevented by ensuring your dog is bathed regularly in a tick repellent shampoo. You can also purchase collars that prevent tick infestations for months – they are an excellent way to make sure your best friend does not end up with this awful disease. If your dog suddenly displays lethargy and loss of appetite, you will need to act quickly to get her on antibiotics, which will clear the bacteria from her blood.

Skin Disorders
Like humans, some dogs have sensitive skin and can develop itches and rashes on their bodies. Some skin disorders are caused by specific, identifiable allergens, like grain or fish by-products, where the pet owner can change his diet and he will be fine.
Some dogs are allergic to grass seeds, which is very sad, as dogs love to bound around in open grasslands. However, as with humans, the trigger for some dogs’ skin disorders is never identified. These doggies will need to be treated symptomatically for their entire lifetime.

Ear Infections and Ear Mites
Ear infections are more prevalent in dogs with “droopy” ears, such as Dalmatians, Spaniels, even more so in dogs with very large ears, like Basset Hounds. These closed-up areas offer the ideal breeding ground for both fungal and bacterial infections, being warm and moist all the time.

You will know your pet is battling if he shakes his head constantly or scratches at his ears. These conditions are easily treated, either with antibiotics or antifungals, depending on the type of infection. You can prevent recurrence by cleaning your dog’s ears regularly with a damp cotton ball, ensuring to clean out any visible build-up.

Kidney Disease
This is not necessarily preventable and it can seem to sneak up on you as a dog owner. Your dog may drop weight and appear more lethargic. He will drink excessive amounts of water and urinate more frequently. This condition can be insidious as it is usually a slow degeneration.

You will initially notice he loses his shine and somehow, he seems a little less energetic, but all other aspects appear normal. Then he may start to lose more fur than usual and lose weight and general condition. Your key symptoms are weight loss and an increase in water consumption. The disease is degenerative and progressive and, while you can take steps to slow it down, it cannot be cured.

Article Supplied

Human Foods You Should Not Feed Dogs

We all want the best for our dogs. We give them a lot of love, take them for plenty of walks and pick them up the best gear from retailers like furry friends gear. However, you shouldn’t always give your pets exactly what they want. This is especially true when it comes to food.

It is not common for a dog to beg at the table for a taste of your food. While many people will succumb to the cuteness and/or whining, you need to be careful. Some human food is fine for dogs to eat, but others can be incredibly problematic.

In an effort to keep your dog healthy, this article is going to go over some human foods that you need to be sure that you never feed to dogs.

Caffeine
While millions of people all over the world consume caffeine daily for its many benefits, don’t let your dog have any. This goes for coffee, tea, chocolate, energy drinks or anything else that could contain caffeine. The reason your dog should avoid caffeine is that they contain some substances that are known as methylxanthines which are found in cacao seeds.

When this substance is ingested by your dog, it can lead to vomiting, excessive thirst, and an abnormal heart rhythm. They can also lead to extreme hyperactivity, seizures and even death in some serious cases. So be sure to keep all of your chocolate well out of the reach of your furry friend. While all chocolate is bad, the darker that chocolate is, the more dangerous it is.

Gum and Candy
While gum and candy can be a tasty treat once in a while, they are other food items you should never give to your dog. This is because many of them contain Xylitol, a sweetener. This substance is fine for humans, but the same can’t be said for dogs. This is because it can trigger insulin release, which can dramatically lower the blood sugar of your dog.

Unfortunately, this has the potential to lead to liver failure. Some signs that your dog may have ingested Xylitol or another toxic ingredient include vomiting, a loss of coordination and generally being inactive or slow. Xylitol is also found in many other products including toothpaste, some baked goods and even some vitamin supplements.

Onions and Garlic
While a staple in many of the dishes we prepare, onions and garlic should never be fed to your pet. Not only can they lead to irritation, but they can also kill the red blood cells of the body. If the dosage is high enough, this could lead to anemia. This goes for if they are raw, cooked, dehydrated or even powdered. All parts of the onion have the potential to be toxic, as well.

The cause of this is a toxin called N-propyl disulfide. This prevents red blood cells from being able to carry oxygen, which eventually leads to them being destroyed. If your dog is vomiting, exhibiting signs of weakness or having trouble breathing and having a reddish tint in urine, could be signs of toxicity due to onions.

We hope this article has been able to help you learn some of the foods that you should avoid feeding to your dogs. Of course, these are far from the only foods that could potentially harm your pets, so be sure to be careful when feeding them any human food.

Article Supplied

Turn your pet green!

We are a nation of pet lovers, it’s true. According to the RSPCA just shy of half of us have one, yet the impact of pet ownership upon our environment can rack up if we don’t take care.

They’re good for our physical and mental health, they’ve been invaluable companions to us during lockdown and… they’re responsible for a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions caused by animal agriculture. So, as we all take steps to reduce our carbon footprint and live greener lives, let’s not forget to look to our pets’ contribution.

The good news is that there are choices we can make to mitigate our pet’s impact on the planet, including carefully selecting their pet food.

When planning how you and your pet can make less of an environmental impact, why not consider the following?

  1. Use biodegradable bags to pick up after your pets and consider investing in a pet poo wormery – these are a great way to recycle waste into useful garden compost.
  2. Choose chemical-free shampoos to wash your pets. Chemical options can pollute rivers and oceans and poison animals.
  3. Try making your own dog toys and avoid plastic or electronic options.
  4. Instead of driving to a location to walk your pet, find a walk closer to home to cut down on petrol use and emissions.

This year, pet food brand Vet’s Kitchen is moving to 100% recyclable packaging. The changes will be made over a two-year period and will cover the entire product range, beginning with dry dog food in October 2020. The Vet’s Kitchen brand, which is dedicated to transforming the health of the nation’s pets through diet and nutrition, have decided to prioritise meeting environmental goals such as these, ahead of many larger pet food companies. To date, they have reduced their plastic use by over a quarter (27%) on some lines and by 17% across the range.

The move comes as part of a re-branding strategy, as Vet’s Kitchen upgrade both their packaging and website design, as well introducing a number of new recipes and pack formats. It is hoped that by actively displaying the OPRL (on-package recycling label) will prompt customers to dispose of packaging responsibly through recycling.

“The Vet’s Kitchen brand is synonymous with high-quality pet food which delivers real health benefits. We take great care to select the best possible ingredients; (with an emphasis on natural, nutritious and local,) and a move to greener packaging solution was an integral part of our rebrand strategy,” says head of marketing, Jilly Whibberley.

Vet’s Kitchen believes that nutrition is fundamentally linked to health and well-being and the lives of the nation’s pets could be improved through diet. It is the only food brand with its own in-house veterinary practice based in Swindon, known as Vet’s Klinic. Their natural products are produced using this ‘Vet Know-how’ and are specifically tailored to meet the dietary needs of cats and dogs, including treating many of the common ailments faced by pets.

Article Supplied