5 essential items when dog walking in the summer!

Well, the longest day has been and gone but hopefully there’s still a lot more summer weather to enjoy!


It’s only when you stop and really think about it that you realise that there isn’t much that can match the magic and enjoyment of a lovely evening’s stroll, out and about with your beloved dog. With this in mind, listed below are 5 essential items of a sensible ‘dog walking kit’ to help prepare you for whatever the summer elements might throw at you!

1. Waterproof Jackets

A ‘mac in a sac’ is an essential garment when out dog walking. They pack away small enough to fit into your pocket or even clip on to your belt but do be sure to get a ‘breathable’ mac – or perhaps one with a mesh lining – otherwise when it’s raining, your own body heat will make the mac wetter inside than it will be outside! Plus, make sure its nice and bright so you are easily spotted when walking home at dusk. A clear advantage of a waterproof jacket is that it is easy to wash and even ‘re-proof’, if necessary!

2. Footwear

Leather walking boots or shoes can be heavy and perhaps make your feet too warm in the summer. So lightweight, yet sturdy, boots or shoes really are the answer. Waterproof and breathable walking boots or shoes are recommended as, at some point, you are likely to encounter puddles and streams which your trusted dog will just love to play and splash in! Nowadays, many walking boots and shoes are designed to incorporate waterproof and breathable membranes that are easy to maintain with just a quick clean and re-proof straight after your walk. However, Grisport boots are designed and manufactured in Italy and there is a selection of quality, sturdy, lightweight boots and shoes that are comfortable straight from the box. No (or very little) ‘breaking-in’ will be needed!

Alternatively, if you enjoy walking through forests or muddy grounds, you may prefer a pair of wellington boots. Neoprene lined wellies, equipped with a Vibram sole will give you comfort, support and grip – which is just what you need when walking on rough and tough terrain, helping you keep full control of your excited four legged companion!

3. Hats

Wearing a hat in the summer has many benefits:

a wide brim hat will help to prevent sun stroke by protecting the top of your head and neck
a baseball cap will help to prevent heat from escaping from the top of head when, for example, on top of a breezy mountain playing with your dog
a wide brim sun hat can be used to host a ‘midge net’, when walking through damp forests or alongside rivers
a wooly hat will protect your ears and prevent ear ache when walking in those very windy areas – even if ‘doggy’ is enjoying it more than you!
a flat cap can be comfortably worn but can also be used to ‘shoo’ away sheep or cattle from paths and gates – out of the way of playful and inquisitive pooches!
a waterproof wax hat has the dual purpose of being used to scoop up water from a river supplying a refreshing drink for your thirsty hound ,when all else fails!

As you can see, having a hat in your pocket or rucksack is very handy and, in some cases, may even be a life saver!

Or if you prefer not to wear a hat, you could consider a headband. These lightweight fleece bands offer great protection over the ears without the bulkiness of a normal hat. Plus, they wrap up small enough to fit into a pocket!

4. Gloves

You may not have thought about wearing gloves in the summer but they are very useful to help maintain a grip when holding a very excitable dog on a lead.

Dexshell Thermfit gloves ‘fit like a glove’! (hee, hee!) Made from a fabric similar to wet suit material, they are fully waterproof and highly breathable. Plus, designed with a unique grip control on the palm and fingers, these gloves will make sure you have the right grip on the lead. These are simply great – whatever the weather!

5. Dog Coats

A dog coat is an essential piece of equipment to help keep your trusted pet cool, dry and comfortable – especially after being in that river!

Made from heavy double-thickness cotton towelling, with velcro closures, the ‘Ruffle and Tumble’ dog drying coats have many uses:

Use 1:

If your pet has been swimming in a river or lake, simply wrap the dog coat around your dog keeping him or her snug. The coat will keep your pet warm and comfortable and help dry them off quicker. Plus, the drying coat will collect up the dirt from their fur by sucking it into the material itself, preventing the back of your car from getting wet and dirty!

Use 2:

If you see that your dog is panting franticly and is over-heating, simply dip the coat in the nearest water you can find and wrap it around your dog. The wet coat will act as a body temperature regulator and will help cool your dog down.

Plus, your dog will love wearing this drying coat as it fits and feels just like a ‘big, big hug’!

So, enjoy being out and about in the summer months ahead…and perhaps more importantly, enjoy spending time out and about with your loving, grateful and excitable four legged friends!

For further ideas and guidance on what to wear when dog walking please visit www.cherrytreecountryclothing.com


Dogs and Humans: Bridging the Gap.

Do you believe in a psychic connection between humans and dogs? Many owners will say that their dog ‘knows’ exactly what they are thinking, or what they are about to do. Some cat owners have this same belief. The question is – how much of this is about the animal picking up on our body language, after all this is how dogs – and cats – communicate with each other, and how much of it indicates a genuine connection? Dog behaviourists have known for a long time that a dog is in constant communication with its owner, even if the owner is not aware of this, and it takes the form of emotional energy. Celebrated dog psychologist Cesar Milan often speaks of the negative and positive energy which our dogs use to interpret our behaviour.

There have been loads of stories over the years about dogs which will sit patiently by the door waiting for their owner to come home from work. Now, if that owner comes home at the same time every day then that is easy to explain away – dogs are excellent timekeepers and sticklers for routine. But experiments have been conducted with the owner returning home at different times of the day to find dog waiting for them.
And here’s another thing: many pet owners will tell you that they have felt the presence of their pet after the animal has passed away. Sometimes it can be the form of a smell or the sound of the animal moving around; sometimes the form of the animal can be actually seen. There’s no doubt that an owner who was close to their pet will struggle to explain the physical sense of the animal being ‘gone but still there’.
If you are a fan of Britain’s Got Talent you’ll know that this year’s winner was an amazing dog act – Matisse the collie with Jules O’Dwyer, following in the pawprints of Ashley and Pudsey. These astonishing acts have been honed to perfection over years of intense physical training but isn’t there something else too? Pudsey and Matisse seem to have that extra unspoken connection with their owners, without which they would not achieve such levels of perfection.

some people

So how can we explain this connection in wild animals?
Big cats in rescue centres have learned to co-exist alongside their human rescuers despite being the ultimate predators. A black leopard named Diablo, which had been taken to a centre in South Africa, was a fearsome creature with an established fear and hatred of humans. Yet he seemed to develop a trusting relationship with animal communicator Anna Breytenbach. She spent time with the animal, speaking to him on a psychic level, and claimed that the cat told her about his feelings towards humans and about his situation. He told her he didn’t like the name which had been given to him – Diablo – because he didn’t like the connotations it implied. Here’s the most amazing part – she said that Diablo asked about two leopard cubs which had been with him previously; he was concerned about them.

The rescue centre owners said Anna could not possibly have known about the two cubs.
The big cat’s experience with Anna seemed to reassure and relax him to the extent that he was able to leave his cage and explore his wider enclosure for the first time. The rescue centre owner was impressed enough by the transformation of Diablo (renamed Spirit) that he decided to attend a workshop to learn more about how to communicate with his big cats.

Learn how to communicate with your dog. You may learn what he really wants!

The post has been created by a member of Derek Acorah’s team of chosen psychics and mediums at Psychic Ether, picked for their outstanding abilities within their area of expertise.


Top Training Tips for Your New Pet Pooch

When you get a new dog, it’s natural to want to spend most of your time playing with your pet pooch, but those first few weeks are crucial for training.

The behaviour your dog learns at an early age will stick, and it’s hard further down the line to get them out of any bad habits that they form. As a result, it’s vital that you stay on top of a dedicated training routine for your new dog in these early stages.

To help you out, here are five top training tips that you can follow to get you started.

Dog Training

1. Positive Reinforcement
Perhaps the most important training tip for a new dog is to use positive reinforcement.

This means that whenever your pet pooch follows an order that you make, you should reward them with affection or a treat so they know they’ve done the right thing.

Psychologically, the dog then learns to associate good behaviour with a treat or a reward, making them more likely to behave well in the future.

When training a new dog it’s easy to become overly focused on the bad things your animal does, but it’s just as important that you remember to show your pet that you appreciate their good behaviour too.

2. House Rules
Being consistent with the house rules you set is very important for your dog’s behaviour, so ideally you want to establish these before you bring your pet home for the first time.
As an example, you might want to keep your dog out of your bedroom, which means you’d need to start closing the door if you usually leave it open.

Dogs will naturally want to explore, so they will see an open door as an invitation, and if they have been to a particular part of the house before they will not understand why they are not allowed there again.

So that your new dog does not get overwhelmed, it’s a good idea to introduce them to your home slowly, perhaps by letting them into new rooms one at a time so they can gradually get used to their new surroundings.

Think about whether or not you mind your dog being on your furniture. If you want them to stay off your chairs and sofas, never encourage them on to your lap when you are sitting down.

If you can, you should give your dog their own private space which they can use for sleeping or whenever they need some time to themselves.

3. Mealtimes
Dogs like a firm routine, so if possible, feed them at the same time every day. This way they’ll know when they can expect food.

Remember to choose dog food that is suitable for your pet pooch. There is no point feeding them a type of food that is particularly high in protein if they are going to be shut inside for most of the day.

Your vet will be able to give you plenty of advice on the right type of dog food to give to your pet pooch. Do not underestimate how important dietary considerations are to the health of your four-legged friend.

Treats are okay, but remember to give them in moderation. Keep them hidden in a place where your pet pooch will not be able to get to them. Keep an eye on whether your pet is enjoying their food and treats, too; if not, you might need to switch to a different product or brand.

4. Body Language
Being able to read your pet’s body language is key, and there are a few signs to look out for when you are training your new dog.

The tail is one of the best indicators of your dog’s mood. Wagging typically indicates pleasure, of course, but a slow wag can instead mean they are angry. If the tail is held low it may mean your pet is scared or nervous.

Raising a paw is usually a sign that your dog is in the mood to play, while it is clear what they want to do if they bring one of their favourite toys to you.

Remember that your pet is learning from your own body language, too, so be aware of how you hold yourself when you are in your dog’s presence.

5. Consistency
Finally, it’s crucial that everyone in the house be consistent when training your dog.

It’s great if everyone joins in with training your new pet, but they need to use the same commands with the same tone of voice, or the animal may get confused.

Make sure everyone is sticking to the same house rules, as your dog will quickly learn what they can get away with from certain family members.

Over to You
Now that you’ve taken a look at these top tips, it’s time to put what you’ve learnt into action.
Remember to be calm and patient with your dog and work hard initially so that you can spend time in the company of a well-trained dog later on.

Author Bio
This post was written by GJW Titmuss, a leading online pet supplies, food and accessories store.


The secret life of fleas

The secret life of fleas – watch our video for a close up look at what fleas get up to on your pet

As new research is released today that shows that pet owners feel embarrassed when their pet has fleas – our video gives a microscopic view of these parasites and even their eggs as they hatch

Fleas can be the bane of pet owner’s lives and are not only an issue for our furry friends themselves, but also for us humans.

New research released today by Bayer Animal Health looks at how many pet owners have found these parasites not only on their pets, but in carpets, beds, sofas and on themselves.

Many surveyed also admitted to not being as on top as they should be of taking preventative measures when it comes to fleas.

But if you’ve ever needed a reason to increase your pet’s flea treatments then watch our video for a very close up look at the secret life of fleas, from how they feed, to the hatching of their eggs.