Gloria Hunniford Joins Campaign for Heart Disease Prevention in Dogs

Veterinary scientists have made a major breakthrough in the management of the most common form of canine heart disease, which has the potential to extend the healthy lives of dogs worldwide.  Gloria Hunniford has joined the campaign to educate owners on potential risks and what they can do to keep their pets happy and healthy for longer.

Heart Disease Prevention in Dogs

Broadcaster Gloria Hunniford discovered that her cavalier King Charles spaniel Gemma was suffering with heart disease when she collapsed earlier this year.  Now that her beloved pet is doing well with the right medication, Gloria has joined a campaign to raise awareness of the commonality of heart disease in small dogs, and encourage owners to seek out information on earlier diagnosis of the disease in their canine companions, to help them live a longer, healthier life.

Heart disease is one of the top five causes of death in dogs in the UK, with MVD accounting for the majority of cases. The disease is caused by the deterioration of one of the heart valves and predominantly affects small breed dogs, including cavalier King Charles spaniels, dachshunds, poodles and terrier breeds.

But the global EPIC study, led by Professor Adrian Boswood of the Royal Veterinary College, found that treating dogs with enlarged hearts – an early warning sign of progressive heart disease – before they display any outward signs delays the onset of heart failure secondary to mitral valve disease (MVD).

Watch our video to find out more.

Finding the right home boarder for your dog!

“You wouldn’t leave your child with an unlicensed nanny, so why would it be okay to leave your dog with an unlicensed dog boarder”

We wanted to talk to you about what you should be looking for from a Home Dog Boarding service.

All too often you may come across an advert in your local paper or on a notice board that offers home dog boarding. The poster may look the part and they may even sound lovely on the phone but do you know what questions you need to asking and considerations you need to take into account prior to leaving your beloved pooch in their care?

Here at PetStay we pride ourselves on our fundamental aim of ensuring the welfare of the dog is at the forefront of everything we do. As leaders in the field, PetStay were the first to be licensed in many areas when the business was started in 2005 by Carole Davy. An avid dog lover, Carole has instilled these beliefs in each of our 32 franchisees throughout the UK and it’s these strong, unwavering beliefs that are the basis of the loving alternative we offer to kennels.

Below we’ve highlighted a few all important things to ask and consider when looking to leave your dog with a home dog boarder:

Dog boarder
• Ask to see a copy of their Home Dog Boarding license from their local council. Every carer with PetStay has to be licensed by their local council before a dog can stay in their home. It is a legal requirement and anyone who wants to board dogs should have one!

• If using a dog boarding service, such as PetStay, you should be invited to see where your dog is staying and meet the carer with whom you will be trusting the welfare of your beloved doggy! EVERY dog owner and of course dog who comes through PetStay meets their dog’s carer at their home before any booking fees are taken.

• Ask to see a copy of the carers’ public liability insurance. Once again, at PetStay, EVERY one of our carers are insured before they can take a dog into their home.

• Ask to see the garden when visiting the dog boarder. Is it secure, is the garden clear of any waste that could prove a hazard?

• And finally, trust your gut instincts! If for any reason you don’t feel comfortable with the dog boarder or there is something that is niggling you…or even your dog…take it as a sign and walk away!

Dog boarder
We hope that helps give you a bit of an idea as to how important we think it is that the welfare of your dog is of the upmost importance…not only to you and us here at PetStay but to other dog boarders in the area.

That’s why we use the analogy a lot of “you wouldn’t leave your child with an unlicensed nanny, so why would it be okay to leave your dog with an unlicensed dog boarder”!


Pet Stay

Why it can cost more to insure your dog than your car

Car insurance can be expensive but dog and cat owners are often shocked that pet insurance can be even more. Many people find that confusing; cars are considerably larger and more expensive than most dogs (though some pure breeds, like French Bulldogs, can cost thousands).

Bought By Many have spent time looking into the reasons why pet insurance can be more than your car insurance and have listed the reasons below.

1. Car breakdown isn’t covered by car insurance, you’ll need a separate breakdown policy for that. Dog breakdown – getting sick and going to the vet – is covered by pet insurance.

Emergency vet treatment is expensive because it means the vet has to drop everything, including pre-booked appointments made by other people, to attend to your pet. Garages are more likely to schedule in a slot for a broken down car after they’ve finished their current jobs.

2. Vets are more expensive than garages. Vet bills cover the cost of skilled labour to treat each individual animal, rather than the skills needed to replace standard parts on a car. Although being a mechanic can be difficult and needs specialist knowledge, it takes at least five years to train as a vet.

3. Cars don’t get chronic conditions, most things are a one-off fix. Dogs do and sometimes need long-term treatment. Most pet insurance policies include the cost of medication and ongoing treatment for chronic conditions (as long as these were not classed as pre-existing conditions when the policy was taken out) – these things don’t come cheap.

4. Even when written off, cars can be salvaged for scrap. Insurers sell these parts to cover some of the costs of a claim. Not true with dogs.

5. Because all drivers must have car insurance, the companies that offer it have huge buying power and negotiate favourable rates from repair garages to keep their costs down. This has only just started with Pet insurers – like More Th>n and its network of vets it has negotiated with.

6. There is only so much that can happen to a car and, for a trained mechanic, the problem is not difficult to identify. Dogs can be quite accident prone and get themselves into a myriad of unfortunate situations.

There are many conditions and illnesses that may affect dogs and, much like with humans, these can take time to diagnose. This means more frequent visits to the vet, which adds up.

7. The cost of treating pets is going up quickly as more cutting-edge medical technology originally developed for humans is used on animals. For example, pets can now have CAT scans and gene therapy. While there have been advancements in car repairs, things have not progressed as quickly and at the same level.

Anything that pushes up the cost of vet bills will be reflected in the cost of pet insurance because insurers need to make sure they can afford owners’ claims.

But what it boils down to is that cars are machines and easily replaced. Dogs are living creatures and for many people are part of the family. It is only natural to spend more money making sure these loving, loyal companions stay healthy and happy for as long as possible


Recognise And Help Relieve The Pain Of Your Dog’s Arthritis

As we approach World Arthritis Day on October 12, solutions-led pet product manufacturer, Peak Pet Products, is reminding pet owners that arthritis is not just suffered by humans and that their dog could also be suffering from the pain this disease brings.

A recent study by pet insurer, Animal Friends, has shown that the number of dogs suffering from arthritis has more than trebled since 2015. Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Greyhounds, Boxers and Rottweilers are breeds with the highest likelihood of developing the disease.

The new research, based on a study of 20,000 pet health records, predicts the number of dogs suffering arthritis is only set to rise.  It has also drawn a link between obesity levels in dogs and the onset of arthritis.

Luckily, there are pet products that can assist by delivering enhanced pet care for pets suffering from the disease, including a revolutionary new dog bowl – PetWeighter™.

PetWeighter™ is a two-part product comprising feeding bowl plus weighted base.  Thanks to its design, the bowl is elevated to a handy height of 21cm that prevents dogs having to stoop – something of great help to dogs suffering from arthritis, as it reduces strain on their joints and alleviates discomfort in the neck, chest and elbows.

Although it is a brand new product, PetWeighter™ has already attracted praise from dog behaviour specialists and high profile vets.

Inspired by product developer Charlie the Schnauzer, who needed constant access to drinking water, the high-strength plastic product features a removable bowl on top of a base that can be filled with sand, water, a combination of both or ice, to make it a bowl that cannot move, no matter how hard a dog tries.  Whilst the base stays put, the bowl is detached from the base at feed time and when it needs cleaning.

The elevated height of the bowl also helps to ensure that pups are unable to soil mum’s food or tip the bowl over.

PetWeighter™, from Peak Pet Products, comes in three colours – red, pink and turquoise blue – each with a dark grey base. The bowl is suitable for cats as well as dogs and is designed to last for years.

With a design focused on hygiene, the bowl is simple to clean and has no dirt-attracting cracks or crevices.  It costs £24.99 and can be bought from good pet shops and online from  More information about the product can be found at

1Tell-tale signs that a dog may be suffering from arthritis are an obvious stiffness in the joints, which prevents exercise that the dog was previously capable of enjoying, and difficulties in activities such as walking up stairs or jumping.  Sometimes, a dog may also continuously lick at a painful joint.

A PetWeighter spokesperson says; “Arthritis in humans is a common and well-known problem, but there is less awareness of the issue in pets. World Arthritis Day, on October 12, provides the perfect opportunity to learn more about the disease in both humans and pets alike.”

Osteoarthritis (OA), also known as degenerative joint disease, is the most common type of arthritis seen in dogs and is a very common cause of chronic pain, particularly in older dogs.  OA is a slowly progressing disease, where the cartilage in the dog’s joints breaks down and causes friction between the bones.  This results in the formation of outgrowths of new bone, known as osteophytes.  The cost of veterinary treatment for arthritis can run to thousands of pounds.