Give your dog up to 8 months of protection

We all want to protect our four-legged friends from the threat of fleas and ticks and it’s not always easy to know the best way to do this with the myriad of products available. From shampoos to spot-ons to collars to tablets; the options seem endless. Here we will look at the benefits of a vet recommended collar, trusted by experts, which is now available without the need for a prescription – Seresto Flea and Tick Control collar.

Fleas and ticks

Fleas and ticks – more than just a bite
Fleas and ticks are both blood feeding parasites that will happily use your pet (and even you!) for a free meal. However, the impact of fleas and ticks on your dog can be greater than ‘just a bite’…

Fleas:
Flea Allergy Dermatitis (FAD) – this condition is an allergic reaction to flea saliva that irritates the skin and can cause intense itching for your dog.

Tapeworm – if your dog ingests an infected flea they can become infected with tapeworm.

Diseases – infected fleas can pass on diseases to dogs when they bite. One study found that half of fleas carried at least one bacterial disease

Anaemia – multiple flea bites can lead to loss of blood, resulting in anaemia, which is particularly dangerous for flea-infested puppies, small breeds, elderly dogs and pregnant bitches, who may also be more vulnerable to heavy infestation.

Fleas are also prolific breeders, with females laying up to 2,000 eggs in their lifetime. The majority of the flea life cycle doesn’t actually occur on your furry friend – the eggs drop off around your home, developing into larvae, pupae and then juvenile fleas. In fact, only 5% of the flea population is found on your pet in an infestation, the other 95% is in the environment – lurking in carpets and soft furnishings! This can make treating a flea infestation tricky, as you not only need to think about treating your pets, but also your home. Ensuring your dog is protected from fleas can help to protect you and your home from an infestation.

Ticks:
Ticks can carry a range of diseases, which can be transmitted to your dog when they bite and feed. These include Lyme disease and canine babesiosis, both of which are serious conditions and require veterinary treatment. Using a product on your dog that repels and kills ticks before they get a chance to bite helps to prevent them passing on any nasty diseases.

Prevention is better than treatment:
Seresto Flea and Tick Control collar kills fleas and repels & kills ticks without the need for them to bite your pet * The collar’s slow-release dosing allows the active ingredients to spread across your pet’s skin and coat at a controlled and steady rate, for all-over protection. It lasts for up to eight months in a single application – the longest lasting flea and tick protection available.

The vet-recommended collar is easy to use – just pop it on your dog for up to eight months of protection and up to #8months of love. No mess, no grease, no smell – and no need to remember monthly flea and tick applications. For the adventurers out there, the collar is water-resistant, † and the ratchet-release system allows it to loosen if your pet gets snagged on their travels!

Fleas and ticks are a year-round problem so it is important to use preventatives throughout the year to keep your pet protected. Seresto Flea and Tick Control collar is now available without a prescription from your vet, online and at pet stores, making it easier than ever to keep your pet protected year-round.

For more information about Seresto Flea and Tick Control collar visit: http://bit.ly/2VuJYjr

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Dogs and Portion Control – How much should you be feeding your Dog?

dog food

How much and how often you should be feeding your canine friend is a topic of frequent contention among dog owners, particularly as there is a lot of conflicting information available out there. With so many different brands and types of feed available on the market, it can be tricky knowing what the correct portions should be, based on your dog’s breed, size and activity levels.

Obesity in dogs continues to be a problem, and with over 60% of vets stating that the biggest health and welfare concern for pets in the UK is them being overweight, it is important to ensure your dog is eating the right amount of food.

Here, we discuss the key factors to take into consideration when determining how much food to give your dog.

Age
From the very moment you bring your beautiful new puppy home, you are in control of how their diet and lifestyle will affect their growth and health. As such, ensuring that they are eating the correct number of meals per day for each stage of their life is essential.

Generally speaking, puppies between 8-12 weeks old should be eating around four meals per day. Then, from 12 weeks to six months, this can be reduced to three meals, and dropping down to two meals as they continue to grow. When a dog enters their adult life, just one meal per day is sufficient to provide them with the energy and nutrition they need.

It is important to stick to one type of food and refrain from feeding them too many doggie treats, since this can lead to excessive calorie intake, which can, of course, make them overweight or lead to an upset stomach. If you are noticing your dog looking larger than before, or if they are going to the toilet more than usual, this may be a sign that they are eating more than they should be.

Bear in mind that the age at which you should switch from puppy/junior dog food to adult food will vary from breed to breed. In general, small dog breeds normally make the transition between 8-10 months old, and larger breeds between 12-18 months. Check with your vet for specific advice and information regarding your dog.

Lifestyle and activity
Once your dog hits adulthood, one major factor which will determine their daily food allowance will be their lifestyle, especially how active they are. Again, observation and judgement should be exercised, particularly since not all breeds conform to their stereotypes. Infamous speed-merchants like Greyhounds can, in fact, turn out to be total couch-potatoes. Likewise, tiny Chihuahuas can be highly-active racers!

As such, understanding the behaviour and characteristics of your pet in particular is key, since too little or too much food can greatly affect their health and growth. If you notice changes to your dog, be sure to adjust their portions in order to keep a good Body Condition Score (BCS).

You can easily tell if your dog isn’t eating the right amount, simply by their appearance and behaviour. Take a look at your pet from above – he/she should have a slight waist. You should also be able to feel their ribs, but they should not be visible. Your dog’s coat should also be glossy and dandruff-free. If their energy levels are strange for their breed (e.g. too lethargic or too hyper-active), this may also be a sign that they are not eating the right amount or type of dog food. In this case, food allergies should not be ruled out, and your vet might recommend switching to a hypoallergenic dog food.

Dog size and breed
The breed and size of your dog are crucial factors to consider when determining their diet and portion sizes. For instance, different dog breeds of the same size may have different energy levels and thus, require more or less food. Similarly, large dog breeds can greatly benefit from feeds which support and protect growing joints.

When purchasing dog food, always check the label, which will outline a general food/weight guide, but these should only be used as a reference, rather than an absolute.

The best way to determine if your best friend is eating the right amount of food is to simply practice good judgement, keep an eye or their portions, and observe them regularly for changes. This way, your dog will continue to live a long, happy and healthy life!

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Best Locations for Dog-Friendly Holiday’s in Cornwall

Cornwall is an incredibly popular holiday destination not only for UK citizens, but for tourists all over the world! With a warmer climate than most of Britain, plenty of beautiful scenery, and a whole lot of character, it’s not hard to see why it’s so well-loved. If you’ve got a dog, you’ll be happy to hear you don’t have to miss out, either. There are plenty of dog-friendly spots in Cornwall that you can check out, and we’ve put together some of our favourites to get you started!

dog friendly holidays

Padstow
If you head to Padstow, you’ll be in good company – there are lots of dogs in this puppy-friendly town. A coastal fishing port, there’s plenty to do here, including visits to beaches, coastal walks, and plenty of tourist attractions. Take your dog to visit Prideaux Place, an incredible Elizabethan manor, or play fetch at Treyarnon Bay, a gorgeous spot by the sea. There are also plenty of restaurants, cafes, and traditional English pubs that will welcome your dog. If you decide to stay in the Padstow area, local company Harbour Holidays has a great selection of dog-friendly, self-catering cottages and holiday homes in the town and on surrounding beaches.

Penzance
With plenty of culture and character, Penzance is a hot-spot for holiday makers, and dogs are always welcome! Wherrytown Beach is dog-friendly all year long and is the perfect spot to let your pup stretch their legs and frolic in the sea, and the popular Newlyn Art Gallery will be happy to have your four-legged friend to visit. After a day of exploring, head to one of the many dog-friendly pubs and restaurants for a tasty meal and a locally-brewed drink.

dog friendly holidays

Newquay
If you and your dog are beach lovers, it doesn’t get better than Newquay. Chilled out and with an undeniable surfer vibe, this is a town that can’t get enough of the sea. Check out the many dog-friendly beaches, including Fistral beach where surfers ride the waves, and enjoy fish and chips whilst your pup plays in the sand. Head to one of the dog-friendly bars, such as Whiskers, to enjoy live music and a drink, or take a look at the dog-menu at The Wet Dog Pizza.

Bodmin
For history fanatics, Bodmin is the ideal Cornish holiday spot – and its super dog-friendly, too! It’s one of the oldest towns in the region, and the Cornish Rebellion of 1497 actually originated here. You can take a peep at the past at the dog-friendly Bodmin Jail or climb aboard an old steam train for an afternoon of fun. The Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry Museum is makes for a great day out, and it welcomes dogs, too! You can also enjoy many outdoor spots where your pup can stretch their legs, including The Camel Trail and Bodmin Moor.

If you’re heading to Cornwall with a dog, you can see that you’ll be spoilt for choice! There’s plenty for you to do and a whole lot of attractions to visit, so be sure to plan ahead for a dog-friendly trip that’s packed with fun.

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