The Safest Materials for Your Dog Bowls

dog bowls

You’ve got plenty of options when it comes to selecting a material for your dog bow. There is a variety of options in the market, including stoneware, ceramic, plastic, stainless steel, slow-feeding, nonskid and even automated portion-sized dog bowls. However, even with so many options out there, there are still some materials that are naturally safer than others. According to forthefurry.com, here are the five most common, including an exploration of whether they are safe or not.

Plastic Dog Bowls
This is by far the most commonly used material for dog bowls. However, it isn’t the safest. In fact, it can often be the worst material for a dog bowl.
To start with, young teething pups tend to chew a lot on their feeding bowl. A few minutes without you looking and your little pup can tear the bowl apart and ingest the little pieces of plastic. What follows is internal bleeding and blockage of the intestinal system.
Plastic bowls can also be highly porous and easy to scratch. The result is that they develop crevices that make for perfect homes for dangerous bacteria.

Ceramic Dog BowlCeramic Dog Bowls

Ceramic dog bowls are often a pretty good choice, assuming you’ve done your homework before going out to buy one. You should also take care of them to ensure they last longer. The greatest concern when it comes to ceramic dog bowls is that the glazes used to coat them may sometimes contain harmful chemicals like lead. You should be careful about this and go for those that have been certified for food use and are free of lead in their coating. You should also regularly inspect your dog’s ceramic bowl to check for chips and cracks that can harbor bacteria. You also shouldn’t let your dog ingest any chips from the bowl. With such bowls, maintenance is the biggest issue. They are, however, a terrific choice.

Stoneware Dog BowlsStoneware Dog Bowls

Stoneware bowls may have trace amounts of lead so you should be careful about the ones you buy. Lead is very dangerous for pets and can lead to lead poisoning. The symptoms of lead poisoning include cardiovascular problems, renal and kidney problems, skeletal problems, disorders of the muscles and joints, nerve disorders, loss of memory, intellectual impairment, mood swings, infertility and cancer. Select stoneware bowls that are free of lead. Apart from the lead issue, however, stoneware dog bowls are much safer than plastic dog bowls as they don’t chip as easily.

Silicone Dog Bowls
Silicone is a relatively recent material on the market. It is rubber-like, nonstick and nontoxic. It has high heat resistance and does not retain any odors. It can also help you save space as such dog bowls are typically collapsible.

Stainless Steel Dog BowlsStainless Steel Dog Bowls

These dog bowls are nonporous, which means you don’t have to worry about bacteria. They are also resistant to rust and very easy to clean. Steel also isn’t exposed to as many dangerous chemicals as plastic is during its manufacture.

Animal Welfare Act 2018: What does it mean?

Important changes are taking place in England, affecting anyone who breeds, boards, sells or provides day care for dogs. From 1st of October, the new Animal Welfare Act 2018 will come into force providing extra protection for the welfare of our pets.

Animal Welfare Act 2018

From October, dog owners in England will be able to check whether a doggy daycare or home boarder have a licence and see a star-rating awarded by the local authority. The amendments to the Animal Welfare Act will bring changes in terms of licensing and local authority compliance to anyone who sells, breeds or cares for dogs as a business.

As stated on the Dogs Trust website: “There have been significant advances in the understanding of dog behaviour and welfare in recent decades. [We are] pleased that the Government is updating this old legislation, which pre-dates the Animal Welfare Act, and are introducing measures to ensure those conducting animal activities are doing so to the best standards of animal welfare.”

Who must be licensed?

Boarding kennels
At-home boarders
Breeders
Doggy day-care providers

However, the changes to the legislation allow dog walkers, dog groomers, and dog hydrotherapists to continue without the need for a licence from their local council.

A key reform to replace a variety of outdated legislation will be to introduce a single licence for pet vending (selling), dog breeding and animal boarding including home dog boarders and pet daycare. These licences will be issued for a fixed term rather than annually at any point in the year.

Each council will use a risk-based approach to licensing, meaning lower risk and high performing business will be allowed a longer licence with fewer inspections. This new practice aims at incentivising licence holders to operate at and maintain higher standards, enabling council resources to better targeted.

For breeders and sellers, stricter regulations under the new licence will mean better protection for dogs. From October, it will be prohibited to sell puppies below the age of eight weeks in all cases matching the regulation already in place in Wales and Scotland.

The Government, along with several animal charities, hopes the new legislation and focus will help tackle puppy farms in the UK and make it easier for councils to focus their attention on combating issues affecting animal welfare in their local areas.

PetStay has been a strong advocate for licensing, ensuring all their carers across the 42 branches hold a valid licence to care for dogs in their home. Established since 2005, PetStay has built a reputation on the high criteria of their dog carers, ensuring they are checked by branch owners as well as the local authority.

To find out more about our PetStay Carers click here.

petstay

ANIMAL MAGIC COMES TO MAIDSTONE AS ‘WE LOVE PETS’ FRANCHISE OPENS!

Award-winning animal care franchise We Love Pets has opened a new branch in Maidstone.

The local franchise has been taken up by Elaine Dunn, aged 52, who will be helping pet owners with dog walking and boarding, cat sitting and even looking after snakes, lizards and bigger animals.

Elaine, who recently moved back to her birth town of Maidstone, decided that the time was right to start a new career with animals after leaving the care profession. She has already taken on one member of staff to help her with dog boarding and is looking forward to growing the venture.

The mum-of-four said: “Working with animals is my dream and comes so naturally. Already, we’ve helped customers with dog boarding and walking. It’s important for me to do something that helps people who perhaps don’t have the time or mobility to do it themselves.

“I’m delighted to be able to work with We Love Pets and to continue their great track record. I’m looking forward to providing an exceptional service to my customers and Maidstone is a great place to do it thanks to its numerous parks and nature reserve meaning there’s lots of variety and somewhere new to walk all the time.

“We Love Pets have given me so much support already; they’ve been doing this for ten years and the business model is proven to work. They made me feel they care about me and my success. Plus, being outdoors in the fresh air is such a bonus in any job I’d say.”

For more information, click onto www.we-love-pets.co.uk/areas-covered/maidstone