Most Common Dog Health Problems And Their Solution

Dogs are the most faithful human friend, and owning a dog is a blessing in itself. When it is about dogs, only a dog parent knows that having a dog is not all about relishing happy and fun times with them. They also bring along a significant amount of responsibility, and one needs to take good care of them.

Just like humans, dogs too can suffer from a variety of health issues ranging from skin problems, ear infections, intestinal worms, to eye problems and dental disease. Most of the health issues can cause a lot of uncomfortable symptoms in your four-legged ball of fur, and they might end up feeling devastated.

Thus, to help your canine companion live a happy and healthy life, you must know some of the most common health issues they face, their signs, and a solution to treat the same.

So, let’s move forward and discuss some of the most common health problems your pooch face and what you can do about it.

1. Worms

Heartworms, Hookworms, tapeworms, roundworms, etc., are some of the most common internal parasites and chronic problems in dogs. Well, when it comes to worms, any of these can make your dog feel uncomfortable, but some like hookworms can prove to be fatal for them.

Signs that indicate that your dog has worms include:

Diarrhea
Vomiting
Weight loss
Rough and dry coat
An overall low appearance

If you find any of these symptoms in your dog, then there are chances of intestinal worms living inside them.

The best solution to get rid of the problem is to see a vet as soon as you confront the issue. Also, the treatment will depend on the type of worm your dog has and make sure you don’t try treating the worms yourself because a medication that kills roundworms might not kill tapeworms.

Prefer reading: Dog Heartworm: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

2. Flea Infestation

No human wants to see their dog in pain. Be it any problem; a dog parent wants to free their cuddly kid from it as soon as possible. But when it comes to the blood-sucking parasites, the parent may also become victim to these.

These dark brown colored insects take only around three weeks to turn from one into thousands. Also, these are very common and easy to pick up in dogs, but their treatment is also easy.

Signs that your dog may have fleas include:

Hair loss
Reddish spots on the skin
Persistent scratching and biting
Flea dirt on your dog’s skin

The best way to confirm the presence of fleas on your dog is by testing flea dirt on a damp paper towel. If the dirt turns red, then sadly, your dog has fleas.

Once you know that your dog has fleas, the best you can do is see a vet and find the right medication. But, you may also try various home remedies to treat your dog and help him get rid of these insidious parasites.

3. Hot Spots

Hot spots usually develop as a result of contact allergies, flea bites, or food allergies. These are a bacterial skin infection that irritates your dog’s skin, and they can’t help but scratch or chew the affected area persistently, which may further lead to pain. Also, if left untreated, the problem may grow even larger.

Signs that your dog is suffering from hot spots include:

Consistent scratching or chewing
Visible red spots on the skin of your dog

Treating hot spots may include cleaning and shaving the affected area, anti-inflammatory medications, antibiotics, and steroids. Well, the treatment usually depends on the condition of the spots and the intensity of pain your pooch is going through.

Read more about understanding hot spots on dogs.

4. Vomiting

With so many possible causes, vomiting is another common health problem in dogs. Some of the reasons behind this problem are heatstroke, kidney failure, food poisoning, and intestinal worms.

Signs that your dog is suffering from this problem include:

Of course vomiting
Abdominal drooling
Lethargic behavior
Inability to hold fluids

Once you notice that your dog is suffering from this life-threating problem, contact your vet. The treatment may include fluid therapy and drugs to control the vomiting.

5. Ear Infection

Ear infections are widespread in dogs and can be caused by bacteria, yeast, ear mites, allergies, hair growth in the ear canal, and many other factors.

Symptoms that your dog may have ear infection include:

Ear odor
Lack of balance
Redness of ear canal
Head tilting or shaking
Vigorous scratching by your dog
Swelling on the outer portion of the ear
Discharge from the ear (usually bloody, yellow, or brown)

If your dog exhibits any of the signs mentioned above, take him to the vet as soon as possible. In most of the cases, clearing and medicating ear canal will clear the infection. However, a chronic infection might call for surgery.
Wrapping it Up
Dogs bring along happiness, but they also come with a lot of responsibilities, which their human parent must fulfill. One such huge responsibility and of course, on top of the list is taking care of their health.

One must always stay alert about the common health issues which a dog might face and their behavior. If they do any unusual activity, one must consult a vet to look into the matter.

Also, the health issues, along with their signs and probable solution mentioned above, might have helped you gain an insight into the most common health problems in dogs.

So, the next time you see any of these signs occurring in your loving pet, do not ignore and take the right steps to help them get rid of the same.

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5 Tips To Train Your Dog With Treats

When you bring home a new dog, one of the first things to do is to train it. For me and my family, it was necessary for our new pet to understand simple instructions. It is common knowledge that the secret to training your dog is to use treats because food is such a huge motivator for them.

In our experience, it was really effective when we were doing obedience training. Getting them to perform a task might seem easy for us humans, but dogs do not just understand the way people do. They need something very basic and primal, like food, to learn a task.
 
Training your dog depends on various factors, like the age of the dog and its temperament. For us, using treats to train our new dog was possible, especially if you follow these simple tips.  

  1. Use Small Treats
     
    While using some treats is good because our dog got fed at the same time, but it was important for us not to overdo it. Some dog breeds are prone to obesity and giving too many treats can be dangerous for its health.
     
    Another trick that worked for us was to use different kinds of treats to mix it up and keep it exciting for our pet. Choosing healthy ones was also important for our dog’s diet.
     
  2. Reward Your Dog When It Is Calm And Submissive
     
    The idea of rewarding with treats is to encourage the right behavior, which is why we had to be careful when we give the dog the treats. If you give your pooch a little treat while it is hyperactive or doing something destructive, then you are teaching your pet to act this way. We simply had to wait until the dog is calm and submissive before giving treats.
     
  3. Do Not Use Treats To Bribe The Dog
     
    While using treats is a great way for your pet to learn new tricks, you should definitely avoid using it for the wrong purpose. We did not want our pet to mistake the treat for a bribe. If you notice your dog waiting expectantly for the treat, then this is a bad sign. Ideally, you teach it to follow a command using a treat, but you should rely on this less and less. Our secret is to use reinforcement and praise to make it follow our commands.
     
  4. Reward Each Step
     
    Most tasks actually involve a few steps, like throwing a stick and having the dog get it and bring it back. One huge mistake we made is to only reward after it has done the entire task, which can be quite frustrating for everyone. Instead, we changed our technique, breaking down the task into smaller ones and get the dog to perform them first.
     
    To do this, whenever your pet does each step correctly, remember to give it a treat. Once all the steps have been done correctly, then you can teach it to do them all together. Even if your pet is not able to do everything perfectly, any progress in the right direction should still be rewarded. In our experience, this kept our dog motivated the entire time.
     
  5. Learn “fade the lure”
     
    Fade the lure is an important technique to avoid the treat turning into a bribe. Simply put, you will use the treat the first few times to make it do the task you want it to do and then once it has mastered it, do the same gesture but with an empty hand. Our trick was to replace the treat with verbal encouragement. At times, we still continued to randomly use the treat, but eventually we reduced it until we stopped giving treats completely.
     
    Even without training or experience, teaching our dog new tricks was not complicated, because we used the right techniques. Giving it treats is one of the most successful ways to do it, and it was great for making sure our new dog was obeying our commands and settling in the family well.

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Canine Kleptomaniacs

Canine Kleptomaniacs
Canine Kleptomaniacs

A Devon-based family (in the UK) is hoping that its home-grown card game, ‘Canine Kleptomaniacs’, will capture hearts and minds around the world with its quirky doggy theme and family-friendly gameplay.

What began two years ago as a wet summer holiday ‘distraction from screens’, has turned into a project involving the whole family, and the prospect of launching the game world-wide through a Kickstarter crowd-funding campaign.

The game is inspired by the family’s 5-year-old Sprocker spaniel, Amber (also known as ‘Ginty’) whose thieving antics border on the criminal.

“Her stealing obsession is hilarious” says Matt Jones, the game’s co-creator.

“Socks, pants, slippers, t-shirts, cycling shorts – you name it, she thieves it”.

Matt Jones, who is married to Jo, with three kids, explains how the whole family has been involved in the project:

“It was never our intention to make a game for other people, it was just a bit of a giggle and a way of us keeping the kids off screens! It has been amazing to see the creativity and how everyone has chipped in ideas”.

Eldest son Ollie (18) has spent hundreds of hours creating quirky illustrations for the cards, making video trailers, setting up websites and managing social media.

“What started out as scribbled drawings on scraps of paper in our caravan has turned into this potentially huge thing”, says mum Jo.

“It’s all a bit scary, really, but the kids have led the way, and they’re so determined to see the game made that they have encouraged us to keep going”.

Now the family has set up a small company, named Golden Ginty Games (in reference to the family pup who has inspired it all), and they hope to raise enough money to produce the game.

“Now we’ve got this far, we have this amazing opportunity to use it for something really positive, and that’s something the kids are into” – says Jo. “Once we decided to go for it, we agreed as a family, that if we were successful, we would give something back”.

The family has decided that a share of any future profits* will go to charities who seek to bring dogs into vulnerable people’s lives, supporting them through providing therapy and companionship.

“The strongly doggy theme makes these causes a natural fit, and we have a particular heart for helping young people and the homeless” adds Matt.

It is still early days for the fledgling family venture as they are now running their first crowdfunding campaign on the website Kickstarter.

The perfect solution to all your dog friendly needs

Head on the keyboard, I’ve had enough.  I’m tired of looking for the perfect solution to my needs.  I grab my coffee and head over to the back door where I stick my head out for some fresh air, oh I wish I could have a holiday somewhere quiet away from it all.  I know that’s not possible because of Lula my mix breed dog, she’s an absolute nightmare on the lead, in the house, in the car, you name it I hide from it!  So here I am stuck at home with my barking, lead pulling (that’s why we don’t get out much) dog.  I do love her and want to have a special bond with her but I can’t find what I’m looking for, I don’t even know what I’m looking for.

I pick up a tennis ball and throw it into the garden, Lula loves to play a game of fetch, it brings her alive and she brings it back and runs to fetch it, this could go on for hours how come it doesn’t make her tired?  I bring her in and try to wipe her paws, yes you guessed it she doesn’t like that either and we end up in a wrestling match with me flat on my face in the middle of the kitchen floor.

That’s it, I’ve had enough! I slam the back door and head out of the kitchen back to the computer.  I know what I’m looking for!  Dog Trainer in King’s Lynn is added to the web browser.  Dog Trainers, Behaviourists and Clubs/King’s Lynn/Norfolk wow that’s the one! I click and get a bright dog friendly page full of dog trainers in King’s Lynn.  I look though a few of the premium pages and it catches my eye Game Based Trainer.  Lula it is meant to be young lady, today is day one of our new journey.

The website was bright, light and full of fun, showing how games created learning through choice – I was hooked and clicked on the Make an Enquiry button on The Good Dog Website.  Excited I jumped up and made another coffee returning quickly to The Good Dog Guide website and where it said click to choose a category I chose Self Catering and in lovely Norfolk.  I booked our holiday for September which gives us four months of intensive game based training sessions to have the best holiday ever!

Thank you The Good Dog Guide you have it all covered!

Article supplied by to Julie Carter at MyLuka Dog Training Solutions

Dog Heartworm: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

The heartworm is a dangerous and potentially deadly parasite that is transmitted to dogs by mosquitoes. Here are some answers to frequently asked questions on this prevalent canine medical condition.

What are the symptoms?

The severity of the symptoms determines its classification. Dogs can have Class 1, Class 2 or Class 3 heartworm disease.

Class 1
It its earliest stages, dogs that have heartworm disease may not present any symptoms at all, making the condition especially difficult to detect and treat.

Class 2
Dogs with Class 2 heartworm disease may suffer from chronic bouts of coughing and become increasingly reluctant to engage in physical activity.

Class 3
Class 3 is the most severe form of the disease. At this stage, symptoms may include fainting, intolerance to exercise, diarrhea, vomiting, fainting and anemia. The veterinarian may also find that the dog has an abnormal heart rate and high blood pressure.


Is heartworm dangerous?
Heartworm may lead to high blood pressure and lethargy, and eventually cause heart failure. It is imperative that you have your dog examined as soon as possible if you suspect that it’s infected.

The veterinarian may perform an electrocardiograph scan to look for any abnormalities of the heart. Diagnosing and treating heartworm disease can save your dog’s life.

How is heartworm treated?
Young heartworms can be killed with a medication called prophylaxis. Dogs that have adult heartworms will need to be hospitalized and will also need a medication that will need to be professionally administered. This medication is often referred to as an adulticide.

Some dogs will be released after a short period of time. Others will need to stay longer. Dogs that have blood clots or other complications may need to be hospitalized extended periods of time.

Your pet’s activity will need to be restricted after they are given the adulticide. During recovery, veterinarians also recommend that dogs follow a low-sodium diet.

The success rate of adulticide is quite high, with close to 98% of dogs showing no signs of heartworm disease once the treatment has been completed.

Can heartworm disease be prevented?
There are many things that can be done to prevent heartworm disease. Firstly, dogs that are at risk will need to be given prophylaxis on a regular basis and undergo blood tests. Protecting your dog from mosquitoes by making sure that it wears repellent can also help minimize the risk.

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Give your dog up to 8 months of protection

We all want to protect our four-legged friends from the threat of fleas and ticks and it’s not always easy to know the best way to do this with the myriad of products available. From shampoos to spot-ons to collars to tablets; the options seem endless. Here we will look at the benefits of a vet recommended collar, trusted by experts, which is now available without the need for a prescription – Seresto Flea and Tick Control collar.

Fleas and ticks

Fleas and ticks – more than just a bite
Fleas and ticks are both blood feeding parasites that will happily use your pet (and even you!) for a free meal. However, the impact of fleas and ticks on your dog can be greater than ‘just a bite’…

Fleas:
Flea Allergy Dermatitis (FAD) – this condition is an allergic reaction to flea saliva that irritates the skin and can cause intense itching for your dog.

Tapeworm – if your dog ingests an infected flea they can become infected with tapeworm.

Diseases – infected fleas can pass on diseases to dogs when they bite. One study found that half of fleas carried at least one bacterial disease

Anaemia – multiple flea bites can lead to loss of blood, resulting in anaemia, which is particularly dangerous for flea-infested puppies, small breeds, elderly dogs and pregnant bitches, who may also be more vulnerable to heavy infestation.

Fleas are also prolific breeders, with females laying up to 2,000 eggs in their lifetime. The majority of the flea life cycle doesn’t actually occur on your furry friend – the eggs drop off around your home, developing into larvae, pupae and then juvenile fleas. In fact, only 5% of the flea population is found on your pet in an infestation, the other 95% is in the environment – lurking in carpets and soft furnishings! This can make treating a flea infestation tricky, as you not only need to think about treating your pets, but also your home. Ensuring your dog is protected from fleas can help to protect you and your home from an infestation.

Ticks:
Ticks can carry a range of diseases, which can be transmitted to your dog when they bite and feed. These include Lyme disease and canine babesiosis, both of which are serious conditions and require veterinary treatment. Using a product on your dog that repels and kills ticks before they get a chance to bite helps to prevent them passing on any nasty diseases.

Prevention is better than treatment:
Seresto Flea and Tick Control collar kills fleas and repels & kills ticks without the need for them to bite your pet * The collar’s slow-release dosing allows the active ingredients to spread across your pet’s skin and coat at a controlled and steady rate, for all-over protection. It lasts for up to eight months in a single application – the longest lasting flea and tick protection available.

The vet-recommended collar is easy to use – just pop it on your dog for up to eight months of protection and up to #8months of love. No mess, no grease, no smell – and no need to remember monthly flea and tick applications. For the adventurers out there, the collar is water-resistant, † and the ratchet-release system allows it to loosen if your pet gets snagged on their travels!

Fleas and ticks are a year-round problem so it is important to use preventatives throughout the year to keep your pet protected. Seresto Flea and Tick Control collar is now available without a prescription from your vet, online and at pet stores, making it easier than ever to keep your pet protected year-round.

For more information about Seresto Flea and Tick Control collar visit: http://bit.ly/2VuJYjr

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Dogs and Portion Control – How much should you be feeding your Dog?

dog food

How much and how often you should be feeding your canine friend is a topic of frequent contention among dog owners, particularly as there is a lot of conflicting information available out there. With so many different brands and types of feed available on the market, it can be tricky knowing what the correct portions should be, based on your dog’s breed, size and activity levels.

Obesity in dogs continues to be a problem, and with over 60% of vets stating that the biggest health and welfare concern for pets in the UK is them being overweight, it is important to ensure your dog is eating the right amount of food.

Here, we discuss the key factors to take into consideration when determining how much food to give your dog.

Age
From the very moment you bring your beautiful new puppy home, you are in control of how their diet and lifestyle will affect their growth and health. As such, ensuring that they are eating the correct number of meals per day for each stage of their life is essential.

Generally speaking, puppies between 8-12 weeks old should be eating around four meals per day. Then, from 12 weeks to six months, this can be reduced to three meals, and dropping down to two meals as they continue to grow. When a dog enters their adult life, just one meal per day is sufficient to provide them with the energy and nutrition they need.

It is important to stick to one type of food and refrain from feeding them too many doggie treats, since this can lead to excessive calorie intake, which can, of course, make them overweight or lead to an upset stomach. If you are noticing your dog looking larger than before, or if they are going to the toilet more than usual, this may be a sign that they are eating more than they should be.

Bear in mind that the age at which you should switch from puppy/junior dog food to adult food will vary from breed to breed. In general, small dog breeds normally make the transition between 8-10 months old, and larger breeds between 12-18 months. Check with your vet for specific advice and information regarding your dog.

Lifestyle and activity
Once your dog hits adulthood, one major factor which will determine their daily food allowance will be their lifestyle, especially how active they are. Again, observation and judgement should be exercised, particularly since not all breeds conform to their stereotypes. Infamous speed-merchants like Greyhounds can, in fact, turn out to be total couch-potatoes. Likewise, tiny Chihuahuas can be highly-active racers!

As such, understanding the behaviour and characteristics of your pet in particular is key, since too little or too much food can greatly affect their health and growth. If you notice changes to your dog, be sure to adjust their portions in order to keep a good Body Condition Score (BCS).

You can easily tell if your dog isn’t eating the right amount, simply by their appearance and behaviour. Take a look at your pet from above – he/she should have a slight waist. You should also be able to feel their ribs, but they should not be visible. Your dog’s coat should also be glossy and dandruff-free. If their energy levels are strange for their breed (e.g. too lethargic or too hyper-active), this may also be a sign that they are not eating the right amount or type of dog food. In this case, food allergies should not be ruled out, and your vet might recommend switching to a hypoallergenic dog food.

Dog size and breed
The breed and size of your dog are crucial factors to consider when determining their diet and portion sizes. For instance, different dog breeds of the same size may have different energy levels and thus, require more or less food. Similarly, large dog breeds can greatly benefit from feeds which support and protect growing joints.

When purchasing dog food, always check the label, which will outline a general food/weight guide, but these should only be used as a reference, rather than an absolute.

The best way to determine if your best friend is eating the right amount of food is to simply practice good judgement, keep an eye or their portions, and observe them regularly for changes. This way, your dog will continue to live a long, happy and healthy life!

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Best Locations for Dog-Friendly Holiday’s in Cornwall

Cornwall is an incredibly popular holiday destination not only for UK citizens, but for tourists all over the world! With a warmer climate than most of Britain, plenty of beautiful scenery, and a whole lot of character, it’s not hard to see why it’s so well-loved. If you’ve got a dog, you’ll be happy to hear you don’t have to miss out, either. There are plenty of dog-friendly spots in Cornwall that you can check out, and we’ve put together some of our favourites to get you started!

dog friendly holidays

Padstow
If you head to Padstow, you’ll be in good company – there are lots of dogs in this puppy-friendly town. A coastal fishing port, there’s plenty to do here, including visits to beaches, coastal walks, and plenty of tourist attractions. Take your dog to visit Prideaux Place, an incredible Elizabethan manor, or play fetch at Treyarnon Bay, a gorgeous spot by the sea. There are also plenty of restaurants, cafes, and traditional English pubs that will welcome your dog. If you decide to stay in the Padstow area, local company Harbour Holidays has a great selection of dog-friendly, self-catering cottages and holiday homes in the town and on surrounding beaches.

Penzance
With plenty of culture and character, Penzance is a hot-spot for holiday makers, and dogs are always welcome! Wherrytown Beach is dog-friendly all year long and is the perfect spot to let your pup stretch their legs and frolic in the sea, and the popular Newlyn Art Gallery will be happy to have your four-legged friend to visit. After a day of exploring, head to one of the many dog-friendly pubs and restaurants for a tasty meal and a locally-brewed drink.

dog friendly holidays

Newquay
If you and your dog are beach lovers, it doesn’t get better than Newquay. Chilled out and with an undeniable surfer vibe, this is a town that can’t get enough of the sea. Check out the many dog-friendly beaches, including Fistral beach where surfers ride the waves, and enjoy fish and chips whilst your pup plays in the sand. Head to one of the dog-friendly bars, such as Whiskers, to enjoy live music and a drink, or take a look at the dog-menu at The Wet Dog Pizza.

Bodmin
For history fanatics, Bodmin is the ideal Cornish holiday spot – and its super dog-friendly, too! It’s one of the oldest towns in the region, and the Cornish Rebellion of 1497 actually originated here. You can take a peep at the past at the dog-friendly Bodmin Jail or climb aboard an old steam train for an afternoon of fun. The Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry Museum is makes for a great day out, and it welcomes dogs, too! You can also enjoy many outdoor spots where your pup can stretch their legs, including The Camel Trail and Bodmin Moor.

If you’re heading to Cornwall with a dog, you can see that you’ll be spoilt for choice! There’s plenty for you to do and a whole lot of attractions to visit, so be sure to plan ahead for a dog-friendly trip that’s packed with fun.

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Tips for Making the Right Choice for Your Pet Insurance

Owning a pet comes with a slew of responsibilities, including the basics like feeding and grooming that all pet owners understand. What can create some unrest in a home with a pet is the emotional and financial disruption of a medical issue that requires veterinary care. On average, pet visits to the vet cost £750, per condition, and this can represent a major cost to a pet owner if they aren’t well prepared. Some medical issues require even more veterinary intervention, such as surgery or ongoing treatment plans, which can cost several thousand more.

Pet insurance offers some respite from veterinary costs. Most pet insurance plans provide a percentage of reimbursement for a veterinary care visit, helping offset the expense of an emergency illness or injury. However, making the decision to obtain pet insurance requires some degree of understanding about how pet policies work, what they cover and exclude, and how to know which pet policy makes the most sense from a financial perspective.

Pet Insurance

Understand the Types of Pet Insurance
The first factor to consider when looking at pet insurance policies is the type of cover being offered. Pet insurance plans come in many different forms, with the most common including:

  • Annual policies: these pet insurance plans offer financial assistance for a pet’s medical issues on a 12-month rolling basis. Each year the policy is set to renew, pet owners may be given an option to switch to a new plan or maintain the coverage they currently have. Most annual policies do not cover pre-existing conditions, and while they may be less expensive than more comprehensive options, they may not pay as much to cover vet expenses.

  • Lifetime policies: these pet insurance plans offer the most comprehensive coverage, potentially offsetting the cost of injuries, illnesses, and chronic conditions. Lifetime policies provide for cover regardless of the pet’s age or health condition, but this means the policy will likely cost more for the pet owner.

  • Accident policies: these pet insurance plans provide cover for accidents that may lead to injuries, such as being hit by a vehicle. Although accidents may lead to higher-cost treatments, most pets in need of veterinary care require medical attention for illnesses instead.

Recognise Potential Exclusions or Restrictions
In addition to the type of policy being offered, pet owners also need to take a close look at the specifics of a pet insurance plan. Many pet insurers detail exclusions of a policy, which may include pre-existing conditions a pet had before getting insured. This means that should the animal need veterinary care for an excluded condition, the full cost of care falls on the shoulders of the pet owner, not the insurance company.

Similarly, pet insurance providers may also exclude certain treatments. Alternative medical care, such as physiotherapy or acupuncture may not be covered under a pet insurance plan. Some policies may also have waiting periods that must be met before insurance benefits are available. Others do not cover routine or preventative treatments. Insurers also set limits on reimbursements paid to pet owners, either per condition treated or as an annual or lifetime policy limit. It is crucial for pet owners to recognise these limitations before paying for a pet insurance plan.

Compare Policy Options for Cost and Benefits
A finance specialist from Money Pug, a website used to compare best pet insurance deals, shares that, beyond policy cover and exclusions, pet owners need to do their own cost analysis on a pet insurance plan prior to purchasing. Pet insurance comes at a cost each month or each year, and this ongoing expense can range significantly from one insurer to the next. The cost is based not only on the current health status of the pet and their age, but also the reach of the policy. Pet owners can do themselves a favour by comparing several different pet insurance plans, taking an in-depth look at policy benefits and exclusions weighed against the cost of the policy itself.

Having the right pet insurance plan can make a big difference in caring for a pet without spending an exorbitant amount of money out of pocket. However, pet owners must complete a review of the type of policy that makes the most sense for their needs, alongside the restrictions or limitations or the policy. Carefully reviewing these details as well as the premium amount due for the policy is necessary for making the best decision on whether or not to purchase pet insurance and from which company.

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Five of the Best Beaches in Cornwall for Dog Walks

If you and your dog are lovers all of the sea, sand, and sun, Cornwall is a great place to visit. With some of the most beautiful beaches in the UK and a warm climate, it’s ideal for doggy days out! To help you find some great spots, we’ve put together our five favourite dog-friendly beaches in Cornwall that you should definitely check out.

dog friendly beaches

Perranporth
Easily accessible and with a long stretch of sandy beach that’s perfect for dogs to run, jump, and play, it’s no surprise that Perranporth is a popular spot for dog owners! Bring a tennis ball for some great games of fetch and a towel to dry off your pup after a dip in the sea. It’s close to Perranporth village, making it great for those who can’t walk so far, and has a great seaside café so you can stay all day if you want! Just be aware that in July and August dogs have to be on a lead between 9am and 5pm. There are loads of great dog-friendly places to stay nearby including a great collection of holiday cottages, houses and apartments in Perranporth from Duchy Holidays. This way you and your dog can relax in your home away from home, close to this glorious sandy beach.

Watergate Bay
Another large stretch of uninterrupted sand, Watergate Bay is a seaside haven for dogs. All year round, your dog can run free on the beach, exploring rock pools, playing with other furry friends, and splashing in the water. When it’s time for a break, set down a picnic blanket and enjoy some well-earned treats, watching the tide go out in time for sunset. Stay nearby at one of the wonderful dog-friendly hotels nearby including the sea-front Watergate Bay Hotel.

Mawgan Porth
Pretty quiet and without so many tourists, Mawgan Porth is ideal for dogs who are a little wary of crowds. This is a Sunday Times award-winning beach, too, so you can be sure you’ve picked a good spot! The waves are great for surfing, there are plenty of walks you and your dog can enjoy, and the local area is full of fun things to do and dog-friendly restaurants. Many accommodation providers in the area also welcome pets.

dog friendly beaches

Porthkidney Beach
Just 2 miles from St Ives, Porthkidney is a pretty popular beach where dogs can be left to run free across the sand – just be sure to put them back on a lead when you’re on any of the footpaths. When the tide goes out, this beach stretches for almost a mile into the sea, making it perfect for dogs with long legs who really need to let off some steam. Just remember to bring plenty of snacks and water! The St Ives area is a wonderful place for a holiday, and you’ll be spoilt for choice for dog-friendly places to stay in the area.

Lantic Bay
If you and your dog love a bit of adventure, Lantic Bay is the perfect beach spot. To reach it, you’ll first get to enjoy a mile-long walk across the lush cliffs that shelter the beach and breathe in the fresh coastal air. Once you’ve reached the sand, you can relax whilst your dog runs free, or join them for a dip in the sea. Lantic Bay is near Polruan, across the water from Fowey, on Cornwall’s beautiful south coast where you’ll find a huge range of dog-friendly pubs, restaurants and places to stay.

Finding a great beach for you and your dog to enjoy isn’t always easy, but with these great spots in Cornwall you should find one in one time. Just pick a spot for a holiday and explore with your dog. But remember to check local information as many beaches have seasonal restrictions for visiting dogs.

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