The perfect solution to all your dog friendly needs

Head on the keyboard, I’ve had enough.  I’m tired of looking for the perfect solution to my needs.  I grab my coffee and head over to the back door where I stick my head out for some fresh air, oh I wish I could have a holiday somewhere quiet away from it all.  I know that’s not possible because of Lula my mix breed dog, she’s an absolute nightmare on the lead, in the house, in the car, you name it I hide from it!  So here I am stuck at home with my barking, lead pulling (that’s why we don’t get out much) dog.  I do love her and want to have a special bond with her but I can’t find what I’m looking for, I don’t even know what I’m looking for.

I pick up a tennis ball and throw it into the garden, Lula loves to play a game of fetch, it brings her alive and she brings it back and runs to fetch it, this could go on for hours how come it doesn’t make her tired?  I bring her in and try to wipe her paws, yes you guessed it she doesn’t like that either and we end up in a wrestling match with me flat on my face in the middle of the kitchen floor.

That’s it, I’ve had enough! I slam the back door and head out of the kitchen back to the computer.  I know what I’m looking for!  Dog Trainer in King’s Lynn is added to the web browser.  Dog Trainers, Behaviourists and Clubs/King’s Lynn/Norfolk wow that’s the one! I click and get a bright dog friendly page full of dog trainers in King’s Lynn.  I look though a few of the premium pages and it catches my eye Game Based Trainer.  Lula it is meant to be young lady, today is day one of our new journey.

The website was bright, light and full of fun, showing how games created learning through choice – I was hooked and clicked on the Make an Enquiry button on The Good Dog Website.  Excited I jumped up and made another coffee returning quickly to The Good Dog Guide website and where it said click to choose a category I chose Self Catering and in lovely Norfolk.  I booked our holiday for September which gives us four months of intensive game based training sessions to have the best holiday ever!

Thank you The Good Dog Guide you have it all covered!

Article supplied by to Julie Carter at MyLuka Dog Training Solutions

Dog Heartworm: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

The heartworm is a dangerous and potentially deadly parasite that is transmitted to dogs by mosquitoes. Here are some answers to frequently asked questions on this prevalent canine medical condition.

What are the symptoms?

The severity of the symptoms determines its classification. Dogs can have Class 1, Class 2 or Class 3 heartworm disease.

Class 1
It its earliest stages, dogs that have heartworm disease may not present any symptoms at all, making the condition especially difficult to detect and treat.

Class 2
Dogs with Class 2 heartworm disease may suffer from chronic bouts of coughing and become increasingly reluctant to engage in physical activity.

Class 3
Class 3 is the most severe form of the disease. At this stage, symptoms may include fainting, intolerance to exercise, diarrhea, vomiting, fainting and anemia. The veterinarian may also find that the dog has an abnormal heart rate and high blood pressure.


Is heartworm dangerous?
Heartworm may lead to high blood pressure and lethargy, and eventually cause heart failure. It is imperative that you have your dog examined as soon as possible if you suspect that it’s infected.

The veterinarian may perform an electrocardiograph scan to look for any abnormalities of the heart. Diagnosing and treating heartworm disease can save your dog’s life.

How is heartworm treated?
Young heartworms can be killed with a medication called prophylaxis. Dogs that have adult heartworms will need to be hospitalized and will also need a medication that will need to be professionally administered. This medication is often referred to as an adulticide.

Some dogs will be released after a short period of time. Others will need to stay longer. Dogs that have blood clots or other complications may need to be hospitalized extended periods of time.

Your pet’s activity will need to be restricted after they are given the adulticide. During recovery, veterinarians also recommend that dogs follow a low-sodium diet.

The success rate of adulticide is quite high, with close to 98% of dogs showing no signs of heartworm disease once the treatment has been completed.

Can heartworm disease be prevented?
There are many things that can be done to prevent heartworm disease. Firstly, dogs that are at risk will need to be given prophylaxis on a regular basis and undergo blood tests. Protecting your dog from mosquitoes by making sure that it wears repellent can also help minimize the risk.

Article Supplied.