4 Reasons Why Your Dog Should Wear a Flea Collar

Fleas are exceptionally hardy creatures. Even if you manage to kill all the adult fleas with the most expensive flea medication in the market, you’re actually only addressing 5 per cent of the problem. This is because 95% of fleas are eggs, larvae, or pupae. It is for this reason that effective flea control requires a more holistic approach, preferably one that includes a variety of treatment modalities to help arrest the growth and development of these immature fleas and put a stop to their life cycle. One of the things you really should consider putting on your pet dog is a flea collar. And here are 4 reasons why your dog should wear a flea collar.

flea collars

It is effective in killing and repelling not only fleas but also ticks, lice, and other bugs
Most flea collars act in two ways. First they kill fleas within the first 24 hours of application. Some products can actually start killing the little pests within 12 hours after the initial application. What this simply means is that if your pooch already has fleas, you can expect that 80 to 90 per cent of the insects will be done for within the first 24 hours. Give it another day and the extermination should already be complete.

However, since your pooch will not be confined to a particularly zero-flea area, there is always the possibility of other fleas from the external environment crawling up onto your pet. Depending on the mechanism of the best flea collars that you’ll be using on your pooch, you can prevent this from occurring. A different active ingredient may serve as a repellent for these bugs that they will never go anywhere near your beloved dog.

With this combination of insecticidal and insect-repellent properties of flea collars, you are ensuring the best possible flea solution for your pet. But that is actually not everything because the best products in the market also happen to have a broad spectrum of activity. These are fully capable of killing and repelling ticks, lice, and other organisms as well.

It is much easier and less invasive to use on your dog.
Compared to spot-on flea medications, putting a flea collar on your dog is very easy. It is as simple as, well, putting on a collar. Spot-on topical applications will require you to meticulously part your dog’s fur so that you are going to apply the medication onto its skin and not on its fur. The same is true with medicated flea shampoos. You will have to massage the formulation onto your dog’s skin to make sure that the active ingredients don’t just stay on your pet’s coat. For tablet flea medications, you do know how challenging it can be to shove a large pill down your pet’s throat.

It can work almost all-year round
Topical flea medications have a maximum insecticidal effect that lasts about a month, some as long as 3 months. On the other hand, some of the best flea collars can work up to an amazing 8 months, although 3 to 6 months is the usual norm. With this in mind, you can actually use a single flea collar to last the entire flea season and even further.

It is more practical
This is a natural outcome of the lengthy insecticidal effect of flea collars. A monthly application of topical flea medications means 12 units of the product. A 6-monthly application of a flea collar means you only get to buy this product twice a year.

Flea collars are effective only against fleas that are already on your pooch. That’s why it should be made part of a more comprehensive approach to flea management and not be made as the sole treatment.

flea collars

Crufts 2016- highlights from the world’s biggest dog show

Watch our video to see TV star Mark Wright, and world famous double act Ashleigh and Pudsey, as they visits Crufts 2016

It’s the world’s biggest dog show and this year Crufts is celebrating its 125th birthday.

For over a century the famous canine event has seen dog lovers and owners come together to celebrate their precious pooches, and speak to Kennel Club Assured Breeders, rescue charities and breed experts about how to responsibly buy, train and enjoy life with a dog.

We caught up with dog loving celeb Mark Wright who is on a mission to help dog owners keep their pups happy and healthy this spring.

Mark is urging dog owners to make sure their pets are up to date with all their worming and flea treatments as warmer weather approaches and is appearing at Cruft as part of his role as ambassador for The Inseparables campaign.

Also on hand to show just what a healthy, happy dog can really do is BGT double act, Ashleigh and Pudsey.

Experts warn pet owners about risk of flea infestations as central heating is turned on.

As the central heating dial is turned up across the UK, experts are warning pet owners about the increased risk of fleas in warm households.

New research, carried out by Bayer Animal Health for its ‘Home Invaders’ campaign, has shown that a third of pet owners are unaware that switching on the heating in the autumn and winter months can lead to an increase in flea infestations.

Parasitologist Ian Wright from the European Scientific Counsel Companion Animal Parasites (ESCCAP) UK and Ireland says: “As long as the humidity remains over 75 per cent and temperatures don’t exceed 30°C then for fleas, the warmer the better. Fleas can complete their life cycle in less than 3 weeks at 29 °C so the warmer the house is, the faster they will reproduce up to that point. It should also be said, that fleas can still breed at 17 °C, just at a slower rate.”

According to the research, more than a third of pet owners turn up their heating in the autumn and winter months to between 21°C and 25°C, providing an optimum temperature for fleas to breed in. The study also revealed that one in 10 pet owners have noticed fleas on their pet and in the house during autumn and winter months, indicating they are not seeking preventative treatment at this key time of year.

It is estimated that 95 per cent of the flea population in a home can be found within carpets and soft furnishings, which is perhaps no surprise when almost half of owners admit sharing a bed with their pet and three quarters allow their cats to sleep on their sofa.

Furthermore, 27 per cent of pet owners seek parasite treatment advice online before going to their vet and 10 per cent only ever treat their pets when they see fleas. Worryingly, half of pet owners were completely unaware their pet had fleas until they were shown by a vet. Pet owners are reminded that while the web is a useful resource for gaining background information it should in no circumstances replace the role of a vet.

Paul Manktelow, Veterinary Surgeon, founder of Vital Pet Health and co-presenter of the Home Invaders documentary, says:  “There is a high probability your dog or cat will have had fleas or worms at some point in their life but depending on the degree of the infestation you may not have realised how many live hidden away in your home. It is important to speak to your vet about receiving the right preventative treatment to stop these infestations.”

Richard Wall, Professor of Zoology at Bristol University, says: “Only 1-5 per cent of the flea population is actually represented by the adults on the pet and is really just the tip of the iceberg. The remaining 95 per cent is hidden in the environment. They may be found in a wide variety of locations within the domestic environment, including wooden flooring and car upholstery.”

‘Home Invaders’ is a national campaign which is shining a light on the fleas and intestinal worms that live on our pets and in our homes, and is part of Bayer Animal Health’s wider ‘It’s a Jungle Out There’ parasite protection initiative. You can help spread the word and find out if your pet and family could be at risk, by following the conversation at www.facebook.com/jungleforpets or by following ‘JungleForPets’ on Twitter. You can also watch the Home Invaders documentary at www.itsajungle.co.uk.

The secret life of fleas

The secret life of fleas – watch our video for a close up look at what fleas get up to on your pet

As new research is released today that shows that pet owners feel embarrassed when their pet has fleas – our video gives a microscopic view of these parasites and even their eggs as they hatch

Fleas can be the bane of pet owner’s lives and are not only an issue for our furry friends themselves, but also for us humans.

New research released today by Bayer Animal Health looks at how many pet owners have found these parasites not only on their pets, but in carpets, beds, sofas and on themselves.

Many surveyed also admitted to not being as on top as they should be of taking preventative measures when it comes to fleas.

But if you’ve ever needed a reason to increase your pet’s flea treatments then watch our video for a very close up look at the secret life of fleas, from how they feed, to the hatching of their eggs.

The Importance of Timely and Effective Dog Flea Treatment

Dog fleas are a common seasonal parasite which regularly plagues canines and can bring along a number of complications. The wide availability of treatments and cures leaves no excuses for letting a dog suffer prolonged infestations and possibly incur long-term damage. Here is the rundown on the nature of dog fleas and how they affect their hosts and environment.

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The enemy
Dog fleas, or Ctenocephalides canis, are a blood-sucking parasite species which targets primarily canine hosts. They are similar to cat fleas but are less likely to attack other hosts, such as humans. Their survival period without food is a few months, and female specimens need blood before they can lay eggs in their host’s coat, about 4,000 at a time. The eggs go through a four-stage cycle until maturing over a couple of weeks’ time.

Symptoms
Fleas cause dogs considerable discomfort and agitation. Infested canines scratch their heads and necks and often bite their hind areas and tails – these are fleas’ preferred spots. The continued scratching leaves the skin inflamed and can even result in hair loss. These physical symptoms are often paired with psychological ones, making dogs more nervous and anxious than usual.

Complications
Fleas are more than just a passing annoyance; they can bring on a number of serious complications for dog health. Based on About.com’s detailed report, here are some of them. First off, the non-stop itching and scratching wear out canine fur and skin, exposing the body to various diseases which often bring unpleasant odours along. In addition, many dogs develop allergic dermatitis due to excessive contact with flea saliva. Fleas can also infect a dog with tapeworms which are notoriously difficult to cure. Excessive biting and blood-sucking can sometimes leave a canine anaemic.

Dangers to human health
Many of the above ailments will apply to humans, too. As this account in the Guardian illustrates, the itchy bites affect everyone in the household. In humans, the bites concentrate in areas with gentler, thinner skin such as the backs of joints (elbows, knees, ankles). Dermatitis and tapeworms affect humans and dogs equally.

Effective prevention and treatment
Prevention is the best starting point on the road to durable health. Dog fleas prefer defenceless hosts, so sick and old dogs as well as puppies are at a higher risk. Their immune systems need an extra boost through a healthy diet and relevant food additives. Flea combs are a great way to discover an initial parasite community before it multiplies. Once an infestation is verified, immediate measures must follow. It is easiest to pick effective dog flea treatments from the Pet Medicine Company which carries a wide variety of cures with different strength and range.

Effective Dog Flea Treatment