Dog Friendly Pembrokeshire Tourism Awards Winners Announced

Pembrokeshire’s Dog Friendly businesses have been recognised and celebrated in the county’s first Dog Friendly Tourism Awards held on the Slebech Park Estate. The Dog Friendly Awards initiative was created by Pembrokeshire Tourism and Burns Pet Nutrition and are designed to champion responsible pet ownership, whilst recognising the efforts of outstanding local businesses throughout the county who help to make Pembrokeshire a dog friendly destination for visitors. Following the launch of the Awards in January, over 400 entries were received across the six categories giving the judges from the Burns By Your Side Reading Dog Teams plenty to consider!

dog friendly award winners

The award for Best Dog Friendly Beach went to Amroth. With plenty of sand to play on, rock pools to investigate and waste bins easily accessible, the judges felt this was a great place to enjoy some seaside fun.

The judges in the award for Best Dog Friendly Town or Village looked for evidence of the whole town or village being a welcoming venue for four-legged visitors and their owners! In this closely fought category Saundersfoot came out on top over the twin towns of Fishguard & Goodwick and Amroth.

The Best Dog Friendly Day Out award took into consideration factors that enabled everyone to enjoy a great day out in Pembrokeshire’s attractions. With so many great places to visit and explore the judges had their work cut out to pick just one winner, before ultimately deciding on Carew Castle as their top choice.

The Best Dog Friendly Pub, Restaurant or Café category judges were keen to find a warm welcome for all visitors along with provision for those not using cutlery to eat! Having visited all three finalists including the Brewery Inn, Cosheston and the Hope Inn, Pembroke, the winner was named as the Temple Bar in Amroth.

For the Best Dog Friendly Campsite or Caravan Park award judges looked at how venues were able to go the extra mile to make pets welcome and safe whilst on holiday. Coastal Wood Camping was the winning campsite who offer plenty of space for all to enjoy their holiday, and great dog friendly facilities.

For those not so keen on camping, the Best Dog Friendly Holiday Accommodation award looked at hotels, guesthouses and B&B providers throughout Pembrokeshire the judges were keen to find providers who were clearly committed to welcoming dogs to their premises. Cwm Connell Coastal Cottages beat off tough competition from Fron Fawr Holiday Cottages and Coastal Wood Holidays to win in this category.

dog friendly award

John Burns of Burns Pet Nutrition explained how much he and the Burns By Your Side Reading Dogs Team had enjoyed the judging saying, “It’s been great to see first-hand the incredible work that these businesses are doing to make Pembrokeshire a dog friendly destination”. Echoing this, Dennis O’Connor, Tourism Liaison Manager at Pembrokeshire Tourism said, “Pembrokeshire is a very special place for visitors and we are delighted to have been able to recognise the work of dog friendly businesses throughout the county as well as our fantastic towns and beaches. Increasingly visitors are looking for dog friendly destinations to avoid the distress of leaving their pets in kennels, so the wonderful coast and countryside that Pembrokeshire offers is particularly appealing”.

pembrokeshire dog friendly tourism awards

An Overnights Stay with Man’s Best Friend!

When you’re looking to book a weekend away, the last thing you want to do is worry about what you are going to do with your pet whilst you are away. Over 46% of UK households have a pet, and we know it can be hard to leave them behind when you go on holiday, so why not take them with you? Whilst we know it’s not really viable to put your pet through the stress of getting on a plane if you’re going abroad a few times a year, a mini-break here in the UK could be the perfect opportunity to take your four-legged friend with you on holiday, as he can be easily packed in to the car with your weekend bag to enjoy some time away from home with his owners.

Booking a stay in a pet-friendly hotel has so many benefits, read on to find out how an overnights stay with man’s best friend in the Lake District could be your best break yet!

Dog friendly holidays in Keswick

Save Money!
In most cases, there will be an extra charge for you taking your pet with you on holiday, this will depend on the kind of hotel you are staying in, and where it is. This cost is usually just to make up for the extra cleaning costs, bedding, bowls etc. that will be utilised by you and your dog throughout the trip. Generally, though, this cost will be much less than what you would expect to pay for booking an extended stay in a kennels, or if you are looking into a dog sitter for the time you are away. Not only does this mean you will be saving money on your trip away, but taking your four-legged friend with you can give you the peace of mind you need to have a really enjoyable break, without worrying about how your pet is doing back home!

A Different Daily Walk  
Booking a mini-break in the Lakes gives you a chance to explore an area of outstanding natural beauty; there are so many walks and trails that you know your dog would absolutely love to join you on. Having a stay-cation with your four-legged friend too, means your dog can experience some of the best walks of his life and enjoy spending some time away from home with his family on holiday.

Pet-friendly hotels are becoming increasingly popular, especially in the Lake District. There are so many areas of beauty that you might not be able to imagine spending time in without your four-legged friend. Explore the countryside this year and enjoy an over night’s stay with man’s best friend.

Keswick has been voted the UK’s most dog-friendly town by the Kennel Club, with a number of dog-friendly hotels covering the town allowing you to have your dog join you on your break to the Lake District. The Inn on the Square is located in the heart of Keswick and offers excellent accommodation for the whole family and your dog, get in contact today to book your break!

Travel Essentials For Your Dog This Summer

Travelling can be a stressful time. It can be even more stressful when you have a dog with you. Whether you are travelling locally or abroad this summer make sure you have the essentials that will make your journey much smoother.

Bedding/Dog Beds
Comfortable bedding is a must have. Dogs are like humans, they love to sleep. More often than not summer travel means car journeys, long ones. With a large dog in the boot or a small dog on the back seats of your car, or even both, dog bedding can make travelling with your pet much easier. We recommend if possible taking your dog bedding from home with you. This can make the dog feel comfortable and safe having the scent of home on their travels. There are a wide variety of beddings and dog beds out there. There may be one just perfect for your dog but take time to trial and error. Not every dog likes cushions, thrones or basket beds, they are a very picky animal.

Food and Water
The most important thing to remember when travelling with a pet is food and water. Long car journeys can put extra stress on your dog. He might be sleeping happily in the boot but inside he is probably dieing for a toilet break and a drink like we all are after a long journey. If you are struggling for room when you’ve packed up the car then look into foldable water bowls. These bowls take up no room at all, provide your dog with a drink and are easily washable.
For food, make sure to take treats and chews that will keep your dog entertained throughout your holiday. However, if you are travelling abroad make sure to check what you can and cannot take with you. There is nothing worse than having to leave behind all your dogs treats and food at the airport whilst your dog drools on in the distance.

biker set for large dogs

We have covered the three essentials food, water and bedding. Now all you need is the extras that may be essential, they may not, but they can come in handy on your travels.

First up is the slightly unconventional dog strollers. Suited more towards the smaller dog unless you have the muscles to push your great dane round the park. Strollers can take up a bit of space in the car but if your small dog isn’t that great at long walks and you are planning to do a lot of exploring on your holiday then these are perfect for you. Let your dog see the sites with you without having to carry him or her everywhere.
For the larger dog Biker Sets are ideal. These leads are used when you are cycling with your dog running alongside. They provide safe leading on a bike because your dog’s sudden tugs are softened by the integrated spring safety. If your dog decides to make a dash for it then at least you will not be going with them. These Biker Sets mean that you can enjoy the sites on your bike and exercise your dog at the same time.

When the car is packed, the dog is sleeping happily and the kids are covered in suncream, it is time to enjoy your holiday!
For more tips, travel essentials and accessories then visit our page here.


Taking your dog on holiday? Here’s 8 tips…

They say that a dog is man’s best friend and if you are one of the estimated 8 million households that own a canine companion you’ll know exactly why this is so true.

Dogs really do become part of the family so it’s no wonder that more of us than ever are choosing to bring our pooch on holiday. While you can (thanks to pet passports) take them abroad we still think that renting a UK holiday cottage is the best way to go as there is usually plenty of outside space and no worries about a tricky flight.
Foxglove Cottage – North York Moors

pet friendly holiodays

Prepare in advance
Lesley Houghton regularly travels with her dog (a new addition to the family in the past year) and recently stayed at the School House in Sandsend. She says ‘preparation is key really, make sure you have as much information on the cottage and surrounding area before you set-off and make a list of everything you will need’.

We think that is pretty sound advice and a bit of forward planning should ensure your holiday goes smoothly and your pet stays happy and healthy. Here are 8 top tips:

Check the cottage is suitable for your pet
It really goes without saying that you will need to select a dog-friendly holiday cottage but you should also check the size of the property is suitable for your pet and there is enough outside space for your particular breed.

It is a good idea to check if there are any restrictions such as areas that are off-limits for pets (you don’t want an award winning flower border to get trampled or cream carpets to be ruined) or a limit on the numbers if you have more than one.

Plan your journey in advance
Remember that if you are making a long car journey that you take a bowl and some water with you and have plenty of stops (particularly if it is a hot day). Make sure your dog can stretch their legs and get some fresh air at regular intervals. If your dog is not used to travelling it is a good idea to try them on some shorter car journeys beforehand.

dog friendly holiodays


Don’t run out of supplies
Try and make a checklist of everything your dog might need before you set-off and make sure you have enough food, treats, any medication and the all-important poo bags. You’ll also need to take your dog’s lead and collar which should have a tag containing your contact information.

If you don’t want to take too much stuff with you it’s a good idea to check where you can purchase dog food locally (particularly if you stick to particular brands) and what items the cottage will have available.

Make the cottage a home from home for your dog
Your dog may be unsettled when they first arrive so it is a good idea to take as many of their things as possible. Familiar items such as your pet’s own bed, blankets and toys can make a big difference as the last thing you want is for them to feel worried and upset.

Show them their new surroundings and let them explore (where appropriate) so they start to feel at home as soon as possible.  Dogs tend to be creatures of habit so stick to their routine of feed and walk times where possible.

Get the contact details of a local vet
Hopefully you won’t need to contact a vet on holiday but if your pet does fall ill or get hurt while you are away it is good to be prepared. Research some vets that are close to your cottage and keep their details handy throughout your stay.

It is also worth taking your pet to your own vet before travelling as well just to make sure they have a clean bill of health and are fully up-to-date with vaccinations and other treatments such as worming.

Plan your trips around your pet
We are pretty sure your holiday will involve getting out and about so make sure any places you plan to visit are also dog friendly. Lots of Yorkshire attractions are happy to allow dogs though you will probably have to keep them on a lead. Check out The Good Dog Guide for more information.

Quite a few pubs will also allow dogs offering drinking water (and occasionally even doggy beer!) but it is a good idea to find out which ones will do this before your holiday.

If you plan to venture out without your pet, ensure it is OK to leave them alone in the property and that you aren’t gone for too long. You don’t want to come back to any nasty surprises! If you do plan to be out for the day you may be able to find a local dog-sitter to help out but again it is best to organise this before you set off.

Accredited to Jonathan McGee photos

Make sure your dog is well trained
You should probably ask yourself how well behaved your dog is before taking them to any cottage. Spending some time on dog training before your holiday (whether you do this by yourself or a local class) is a good idea.

Try and ensure your pet can obey some basic commands – even if this is just Sit and Stay.

Keep your dog safe
The last thing you want is for anything to happen to your precious pet so make sure the cottage and garden are secure and there is nowhere for them to escape (it is a good idea to have them micro-chipped though in case they do go missing).

Going for a walk with your dog through beautiful countryside is just one of the perks of taking them with you but it is important to be vigilant. If you take them off the lead make sure there are no dangers about such as cliff edges, streams or wild animals.

With these tips you should have a great holiday with your pet.

Check out the dog-friendly cottages available or call the team on 0844 736 6276.

Dog friendly cottages



Our top 5 dog-friendly holiday cottages in North Wales.


North Wales ticks all the boxes for a pet-friendly holiday.  Wide open spaces, miles and miles of walks, dog-friendly beaches, welcoming restaurants and cafes….the list goes on.

All you need to do then is find somewhere to stay!  Here’s our top 5 dog-friendly North Wales holiday cottages where both you and your pets can relax.

Bron y Foel Bach – Porthmadog (Sleeps 5)
Just THE most perfect spot! Breathtaking sea views, a rural setting, open fire and close to restaurants and shops in nearby Porthmadog and Criccieth.  A great location for exploring both Snowdonia and the Llyn Peninsula, with some excellent dog-friendly beaches nearby including Black Rock Sands.


Saron – Cwmystradlyn, Snowdonia (Sleeps 6)
This converted chapel has to be dog heaven.  Tucked away in a remote valley in Snowdonia, with mountain footpaths and valley trails leading in every direction from the door.    The peaks of Moel Hebog and Moel Ddu are just waiting to be conquered – or perhaps a gentle stroll around the Cwmystradlyn lake instead?!


Cae’r Borth – Lligwy, Anglesey (Sleeps 12+2)
If you are looking for some wow factor – then here it is.  Built by the 8th Lord Boston, and still owned by the family today, Cae’r Borth is the ideal venue for a family gathering or special occasion.  Private beach, direct access to the coastal footpath, beautiful paintings, fabulous dining room, not to mention the seaviews. Oh yes, and a kennel too!


The Bay – Trearddur Bay, Anglesey (Sleeps 4)
If you prefer something a little more contemporary, then this beachside ground-floor apartment in Trearddur Bay on Anglesey’s west coast will fit the bill.  Dog-friendly pubs, walks and a great expanse of beach are all on your doorstep. Walk along the coastal path, pass Bwa Gwyn (the White Arch) towards Rhoscolyn where you can enjoy a leisurely lunch on the decking at The White Eagle, with views across the bay, before heading home – a great walk, and apartment, year round.

Dog friendly

Ty Capel – Rhoscolyn, Anglesey (Sleeps 4)
Colourful and quirky.  This characterful holiday cottage is super cosy. Just imagine coastal walks and pub lunches, lazy days on the nearby beach, stopping off to buy locally caught lobster and crab for supper, before returning home to spend an evening by the fire here? I do…..regularly!


Find a Pet Friendly Cottage for your next holiday
Menai Holiday Cottages has over 150 dog-friendly holiday cottages in North Wales, including  Anglesey, Snowdonia and the Llyn Peninsula. Many have sea views, enclosed gardens, scenic walks from the door or are tucked away in the heart of the mountains. Many will also accept more than one pet

Everyone at Menai Holiday Cottages lives in (and loves!) the area, and many are dog-owners themselves – so if you need any advice, from dog-friendly beaches to the nearest shop for your Sunday paper, just ask.

5 Things Every Rescue Dog Owner Needs to Know

There are thousands of rescue dogs in shelters across the country that are in need of loving homes. If you’ve been kind enough to adopt one, you can be proud in the knowledge that you’ve given a dog a well-deserved second chance. Though rescue animals always come with a few complications, they’re definitely worth it.

When it comes to insurance for a rescue dog, there are a few things that you need to know. Thankfully, Bought By Many have put together a helpful list in order to make the process a little bit easier for you.

1. How old is your rescue dog?
Insurers need to know your dog’s age before you can apply for a policy. When you adopt a dog, sometimes the animal shelter will not be sure of its date of birth. If the dog was given up for adoption by a previous family, they’ll usually have fuller records than if it was a stray.

If the shelter doesn’t know your new pet’s age, the advice from insurers is to ask your vet to give the dog a physical exam and provide an estimation.

2. What breed is your dog?
Likewise, shelters may not know the exact breed of your rescue dog, especially if they are a wonderful cross-breed, and this is also an important part of a pet insurance application. You are advised to speak with your vet and select the closest match.

3. Does your dog have any pre-existing medical conditions?
When applying for a pet insurance policy, you will also need to specify whether your dog has any pre-existing medical conditions, such as diabetes or congenital heart disease – or even a more common condition like an ear infection.

Again, the problem with this is the animal shelter you adopted your pet from may not know if it has any medical conditions. This doesn’t only apply if it was a stray – previous owners might not have known about them either.

Guidance from pet insurance companies is to check with the re-homing centre, or ask your vet to examine your dog for any obvious signs. Be sure to let your insurer know if the vet finds any indication of a pre-existing medical condition.

In the worst case scenario, your pet insurance provider may refuse to give your dog cover. If this happens, make sure to join our Bought By Many group for dogs with pre-existing conditions. The company that provides insurance for this group is happy to cover the dog, including the pre-existing condition, if the dog has not had symptoms, treatment, or seen a vet for it in the last 2 years. Join the group here to get £15 cashback on pet insurance for pets with existing medical conditions.

4. Do you have insurance?
Some charities with rehoming shelters offer free insurance when you adopt a dog with them. For example, the RSPCA will give you 6 weeks of free pet insurance from MORE TH>N with up to £4,000 of cover per condition, while Battersea Dogs and Cats home offers 4 weeks free insurance from Petplan.

Some, like Dogs Trust, offer third party liability insurance up to £1m, which covers you if your dog damages property or if someone is injured or falls ill because of your dog.

However, it’s important to note that these kinds of insurance are either temporary, or incomplete. Third party liability insurance does not cover vet bills. And if the shelter gives you time-limited free insurance, you’ll need to renew it – or get a new policy – when this runs out, to make sure you and your pet are fully covered.

To find the best insurance for your dog, have a look at our guide to the Best Pet Insurance for Dogs 2015, and our Complete Pet Insurance Renewal Guide.

5. Preventing a lost dog
Finally, another vital part of any pet insurance policy is protection against loss. Rescue dogs are often nervous and unsure when first adopted, especially if they have a history of abuse or neglect. Unfortunately, this means that many attempt to run away from their loving new owners.

So, as well as making sure your property is getaway-proof, be sure to look for an insurance policy that will cover the cost of leaflets and a reward just in case your dog decides they’re an escape artist.

Pet Insurance

From Jewkles to ‘Orses, we’ve got you covered

Chances are if you understand the above, you’re a Cumbrian. And if there’s one thing us Cumbrian folk love, it’s our pets! In fact, Cumbria is home to the country’s most dog friendly town, Keswick, and is famed for its dog friendly establishments and dog friendly attitudes.

As you’d expect from a county of die-hard pet lovers, there’s a whole host of local pet businesses – so many in fact that it can be hard knowing where to begin! This is where we come in, Pets in Cumbria is a dedicated pets website, helping fellow Cumbrians with all of their pet related needs.


Our pages contain everything from local pet news and advice articles, to pets for sale, pets for rehoming, pet services & supplies and recommended veterinary practices. We also hold regular competitions where you can win LOTS of pet prizes; we believe every pet deserves to be pampered now and again.

So, what’re you waiting for? Head to or join us on Twitter at @petsincumbria or on Facebook at

Ps. For the non-Cumbrians among us, a jewkle is a dog and a ‘orse is a horse!

5 essential items when dog walking in the summer!

Well, the longest day has been and gone but hopefully there’s still a lot more summer weather to enjoy!


It’s only when you stop and really think about it that you realise that there isn’t much that can match the magic and enjoyment of a lovely evening’s stroll, out and about with your beloved dog. With this in mind, listed below are 5 essential items of a sensible ‘dog walking kit’ to help prepare you for whatever the summer elements might throw at you!

1. Waterproof Jackets

A ‘mac in a sac’ is an essential garment when out dog walking. They pack away small enough to fit into your pocket or even clip on to your belt but do be sure to get a ‘breathable’ mac – or perhaps one with a mesh lining – otherwise when it’s raining, your own body heat will make the mac wetter inside than it will be outside! Plus, make sure its nice and bright so you are easily spotted when walking home at dusk. A clear advantage of a waterproof jacket is that it is easy to wash and even ‘re-proof’, if necessary!

2. Footwear

Leather walking boots or shoes can be heavy and perhaps make your feet too warm in the summer. So lightweight, yet sturdy, boots or shoes really are the answer. Waterproof and breathable walking boots or shoes are recommended as, at some point, you are likely to encounter puddles and streams which your trusted dog will just love to play and splash in! Nowadays, many walking boots and shoes are designed to incorporate waterproof and breathable membranes that are easy to maintain with just a quick clean and re-proof straight after your walk. However, Grisport boots are designed and manufactured in Italy and there is a selection of quality, sturdy, lightweight boots and shoes that are comfortable straight from the box. No (or very little) ‘breaking-in’ will be needed!

Alternatively, if you enjoy walking through forests or muddy grounds, you may prefer a pair of wellington boots. Neoprene lined wellies, equipped with a Vibram sole will give you comfort, support and grip – which is just what you need when walking on rough and tough terrain, helping you keep full control of your excited four legged companion!

3. Hats

Wearing a hat in the summer has many benefits:

a wide brim hat will help to prevent sun stroke by protecting the top of your head and neck
a baseball cap will help to prevent heat from escaping from the top of head when, for example, on top of a breezy mountain playing with your dog
a wide brim sun hat can be used to host a ‘midge net’, when walking through damp forests or alongside rivers
a wooly hat will protect your ears and prevent ear ache when walking in those very windy areas – even if ‘doggy’ is enjoying it more than you!
a flat cap can be comfortably worn but can also be used to ‘shoo’ away sheep or cattle from paths and gates – out of the way of playful and inquisitive pooches!
a waterproof wax hat has the dual purpose of being used to scoop up water from a river supplying a refreshing drink for your thirsty hound ,when all else fails!

As you can see, having a hat in your pocket or rucksack is very handy and, in some cases, may even be a life saver!

Or if you prefer not to wear a hat, you could consider a headband. These lightweight fleece bands offer great protection over the ears without the bulkiness of a normal hat. Plus, they wrap up small enough to fit into a pocket!

4. Gloves

You may not have thought about wearing gloves in the summer but they are very useful to help maintain a grip when holding a very excitable dog on a lead.

Dexshell Thermfit gloves ‘fit like a glove’! (hee, hee!) Made from a fabric similar to wet suit material, they are fully waterproof and highly breathable. Plus, designed with a unique grip control on the palm and fingers, these gloves will make sure you have the right grip on the lead. These are simply great – whatever the weather!

5. Dog Coats

A dog coat is an essential piece of equipment to help keep your trusted pet cool, dry and comfortable – especially after being in that river!

Made from heavy double-thickness cotton towelling, with velcro closures, the ‘Ruffle and Tumble’ dog drying coats have many uses:

Use 1:

If your pet has been swimming in a river or lake, simply wrap the dog coat around your dog keeping him or her snug. The coat will keep your pet warm and comfortable and help dry them off quicker. Plus, the drying coat will collect up the dirt from their fur by sucking it into the material itself, preventing the back of your car from getting wet and dirty!

Use 2:

If you see that your dog is panting franticly and is over-heating, simply dip the coat in the nearest water you can find and wrap it around your dog. The wet coat will act as a body temperature regulator and will help cool your dog down.

Plus, your dog will love wearing this drying coat as it fits and feels just like a ‘big, big hug’!

So, enjoy being out and about in the summer months ahead…and perhaps more importantly, enjoy spending time out and about with your loving, grateful and excitable four legged friends!

For further ideas and guidance on what to wear when dog walking please visit


Top tips: going on holiday with your dog


Dogs are part of the family and love time away with humans on a summer holiday. Planning ahead is essential, so we’ve put together some top tips to help you make sure you all have a great time…

Taking pets abroad If you are going abroad check the pet passport requirements carefully and make sure your dog has any necessary vaccinations.

If you’re heading to Europe, travel by Eurotunnel is safest, as your pets stays with you all the time, whereas on cross channel ferries your dog will have to stay in the car without you, and without any supervision.

There are several diseases in Europe that aren’t found in the UK, often spread by ticks and biting insects.

Effective tick control is essential for travelling dogs, and in some areas you will need to protect against diseases carried by biting insects such as heartworm and leishmaniasis.

Ask your vet about specific treatment before travelling abroad.
Don’t forget to check if your pet insurance is valid overseas.
If your pet is on medication take a plentiful supply. Be vigilant for hazards like roads and rivers and careful with pets around unfamiliar dogs.

Make sure your dog’s tag has your mobile on it so they can be returned to you quickly if they get lost. It goes without saying that your dog should be microchipped and your contact details should be up to date (see below for more on ID).
It’s worth checking out local legislation before you travel too, as different countries have different laws on dogs.

In Italy, for example, dog owners are required to carry a muzzle and should put it on their pet when asked. In this case, it’s a good idea to get your dog muzzle trained before you head off so they are used to it if they have to put it on.

Some countries have breed-specific legislation and the list of which breeds and types of dogs are banned may differ from the UK. Laws banning some types of dog might not be the same in all part of a country, so check you know what the rules are in the part you are visiting.

Wherever you’re going, home or abroad – your pet will appreciate some familiar things such as their own bed and favourite toys, so don’t forget to pack these.

Staycation Check the hotel, cottage or campsite you want to visit allows dogs at the time of booking. Some holiday accommodation may charge a small fee for a dog, but this is usually cheaper than leaving them in boarding kennels at home.

Most pet friendly accommodation will have details of the nearest vet for emergencies, but it’s worth checking before you travel just in case.
Make a note of your insurance details to take with you should the worst happen.

Travelling in the car Make sure your dog is secured by a harness or barrier and that there is plenty of ventilation. You can keep the temperature inside the car as cool as possible by using sun screens on the windows to protect from direct sunlight, and by avoiding the midday heat.

To keep your dog cool you can use a misting spray, but avoid his face.
Make sure your dog has plenty of access to clean water.
Never leave your dog alone in the car – even with the windows open. Dogs can’t sweat in the same way we do and can suffer from heatstroke within minutes.

Identification Make sure your dog is microchipped and your contact details on the chip are up to date. This means if your dog does go missing, he can be returned to you when his microchip is scanned.
It is a legal requirement for dogs to wear a collar with a tag displaying the owner’s name and address.
It’s a good idea to have a separate tag made with the name and location of the accommodation you are staying at so a finder knows how to contact you if your dog gets lost while on holiday.

Pet Care 101: How to Ensure That Your Dog Does Not Overheat This Summer

The UK is a nation of pet-owners, and this rather sweeping statement is supported by statistics produced by the PFMA. Dogs are a particular favourite among British residents, as an estimated 25% of all UK households include a canine as a member of their family. While there are a large number of dog owners throughout the nation, however, it is fair to say that there remains concerns about welfare and whether or not every individual takes full responsibility for the well-being of their pet. Owning and caring for a dog should represent a learning process, however, and one which drives constant improvement and dedication.

The Importance of Keeping your Dogs cool during the summer
One of the most important things to note is that there are many breeds of dog, each of which have various subtleties in terms of their behaviour and genetic make-up. There are some universal traits which all dogs share, however, with a tendency to overheat during the summer been one of the most prominent. You must take steps to avoid this, including the following…

1Image Credit: Loupeznik (Wikicommons)

Ensure That Your Dog Drinks Plenty of Water
As a human, one of the key issues caused by extreme heat is dehydration. This can be negated by the consumption of water and fluids, and the same principle can loosely be applied to canines during the heat of summer. While a dog’s genetic make-up differs wildly from humans, enabling them to have regular access to water will help them to remain cool and keep the heat at bay. To assist this process, you may even want to add ice cubes so that the water remains below the existing room temperature.

Use Wet and Damp Towels Where Necessary
During the summer, dogs enjoy nothing more than basking beneath the glare of the sun. While this enables them to benefit from any available breeze, however, it may not prevent them from panting excessively and struggling to stay cool. You can help them to feel more comfortable by covering them in a towel that has been soaked in cold water, as this will help to reduce their body temperature. While your dog may become restless and resist this initially, they will soon welcome it once they feel the benefits.

Create Shade and Shadows Within The Home
You can invest a fortune in pet and dog ownership, from the procurement of bedding to a high quality collar from a reputable supplier such as Collars and Tag. Although these purchases represent a key part of caring for an animal, sometimes all you really require is an eye for detail and an ability to think creatively when dealing with issues. In terms of cooling your dog down when they are inside during the summer, for example, you should strive to move furniture and create a space that is well protected by shade and shadows. This will give them plenty of space to rest, play and escape the heat of the sun when required!