4 Reasons Why Your Dog Should Wear a Flea Collar

Fleas are exceptionally hardy creatures. Even if you manage to kill all the adult fleas with the most expensive flea medication in the market, you’re actually only addressing 5 per cent of the problem. This is because 95% of fleas are eggs, larvae, or pupae. It is for this reason that effective flea control requires a more holistic approach, preferably one that includes a variety of treatment modalities to help arrest the growth and development of these immature fleas and put a stop to their life cycle. One of the things you really should consider putting on your pet dog is a flea collar. And here are 4 reasons why your dog should wear a flea collar.

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It is effective in killing and repelling not only fleas but also ticks, lice, and other bugs
Most flea collars act in two ways. First they kill fleas within the first 24 hours of application. Some products can actually start killing the little pests within 12 hours after the initial application. What this simply means is that if your pooch already has fleas, you can expect that 80 to 90 per cent of the insects will be done for within the first 24 hours. Give it another day and the extermination should already be complete.

However, since your pooch will not be confined to a particularly zero-flea area, there is always the possibility of other fleas from the external environment crawling up onto your pet. Depending on the mechanism of the best flea collars that you’ll be using on your pooch, you can prevent this from occurring. A different active ingredient may serve as a repellent for these bugs that they will never go anywhere near your beloved dog.

With this combination of insecticidal and insect-repellent properties of flea collars, you are ensuring the best possible flea solution for your pet. But that is actually not everything because the best products in the market also happen to have a broad spectrum of activity. These are fully capable of killing and repelling ticks, lice, and other organisms as well.

It is much easier and less invasive to use on your dog.
Compared to spot-on flea medications, putting a flea collar on your dog is very easy. It is as simple as, well, putting on a collar. Spot-on topical applications will require you to meticulously part your dog’s fur so that you are going to apply the medication onto its skin and not on its fur. The same is true with medicated flea shampoos. You will have to massage the formulation onto your dog’s skin to make sure that the active ingredients don’t just stay on your pet’s coat. For tablet flea medications, you do know how challenging it can be to shove a large pill down your pet’s throat.

It can work almost all-year round
Topical flea medications have a maximum insecticidal effect that lasts about a month, some as long as 3 months. On the other hand, some of the best flea collars can work up to an amazing 8 months, although 3 to 6 months is the usual norm. With this in mind, you can actually use a single flea collar to last the entire flea season and even further.

It is more practical
This is a natural outcome of the lengthy insecticidal effect of flea collars. A monthly application of topical flea medications means 12 units of the product. A 6-monthly application of a flea collar means you only get to buy this product twice a year.

Flea collars are effective only against fleas that are already on your pooch. That’s why it should be made part of a more comprehensive approach to flea management and not be made as the sole treatment.

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Recognise And Help Relieve The Pain Of Your Dog’s Arthritis

As we approach World Arthritis Day on October 12, solutions-led pet product manufacturer, Peak Pet Products, is reminding pet owners that arthritis is not just suffered by humans and that their dog could also be suffering from the pain this disease brings.

A recent study by pet insurer, Animal Friends, has shown that the number of dogs suffering from arthritis has more than trebled since 2015. Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Greyhounds, Boxers and Rottweilers are breeds with the highest likelihood of developing the disease.

The new research, based on a study of 20,000 pet health records, predicts the number of dogs suffering arthritis is only set to rise.  It has also drawn a link between obesity levels in dogs and the onset of arthritis.

Luckily, there are pet products that can assist by delivering enhanced pet care for pets suffering from the disease, including a revolutionary new dog bowl – PetWeighter™.

PetWeighter™ is a two-part product comprising feeding bowl plus weighted base.  Thanks to its design, the bowl is elevated to a handy height of 21cm that prevents dogs having to stoop – something of great help to dogs suffering from arthritis, as it reduces strain on their joints and alleviates discomfort in the neck, chest and elbows.

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Although it is a brand new product, PetWeighter™ has already attracted praise from dog behaviour specialists and high profile vets.

Inspired by product developer Charlie the Schnauzer, who needed constant access to drinking water, the high-strength plastic product features a removable bowl on top of a base that can be filled with sand, water, a combination of both or ice, to make it a bowl that cannot move, no matter how hard a dog tries.  Whilst the base stays put, the bowl is detached from the base at feed time and when it needs cleaning.

The elevated height of the bowl also helps to ensure that pups are unable to soil mum’s food or tip the bowl over.

PetWeighter™, from Peak Pet Products, comes in three colours – red, pink and turquoise blue – each with a dark grey base. The bowl is suitable for cats as well as dogs and is designed to last for years.

With a design focused on hygiene, the bowl is simple to clean and has no dirt-attracting cracks or crevices.  It costs £24.99 and can be bought from good pet shops and online from www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01GAM16H2  More information about the product can be found at www.petweighter.com

1Tell-tale signs that a dog may be suffering from arthritis are an obvious stiffness in the joints, which prevents exercise that the dog was previously capable of enjoying, and difficulties in activities such as walking up stairs or jumping.  Sometimes, a dog may also continuously lick at a painful joint.

A PetWeighter spokesperson says; “Arthritis in humans is a common and well-known problem, but there is less awareness of the issue in pets. World Arthritis Day, on October 12, provides the perfect opportunity to learn more about the disease in both humans and pets alike.”

Osteoarthritis (OA), also known as degenerative joint disease, is the most common type of arthritis seen in dogs and is a very common cause of chronic pain, particularly in older dogs.  OA is a slowly progressing disease, where the cartilage in the dog’s joints breaks down and causes friction between the bones.  This results in the formation of outgrowths of new bone, known as osteophytes.  The cost of veterinary treatment for arthritis can run to thousands of pounds.

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Sharron Davies backs No Bite is Right campaign and heads around the country to help keeps pets healthy

As the weather warms up and we approach summer, pet owners are being urged to be vigilant against ticks and fleas which thrive in warmer weather. Watch our video where Sharron and the Tickbuster team of experts tell you how you can keep your furry friends happy and healthy as temperatures rise

As pet owners get set for a summer spent with their beloved furry friends in the great outdoors, Sharron Davies is urging them to make sure their animals are in tip top shape before the summer kicks in.

The former Olympic swimmer is backing the No Bite is Right campaign and is making her way around the country on the Tickbuster Tour alongside a panel of experts, to help pet owners prevent nasty bites from ticks and fleas which thrive in warmer weather.

New research shows that almost one in ten pet owners don’t do anything to prevent their pets being bitten by ticks and fleas, while only a quarter treat their pet with a preventative treatment at the recommended frequency. Furthermore, less than 60% believe they have control over their pet’s protection from parasites like ticks, fleas and lungworm.

But while nasty and in some cases potentially fatal – all of these parasites and the diseases they spread can be protected against by regular use of suitable preventative products available from vets.

Watch our video where Sharron Davies starts the Tickbuster tour at the Ayr County Fair, alongside a panel of experts, to educate pet owners on how to keep their pets healthy this summer.

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Pet Microchipping Essentials

As of April 2016, it’s now a legal requirement for all dogs over 8-weeks to be microchipped in the UK. Failing to do so could land you with a fine of up to £500.

How does it work?
The ID chip is as small as a grain of rice and no more painful than a standard vaccination. The procedure only takes a few minutes, but the benefits last for life. The only thing that you need to remember is to keep your contact details up-to-date.

Why is it important?
ID chips are a worthwhile precaution for your four-legged friend as a microchipped pet is more likely to be returned to its owner if lost or stolen. Microchipping will also help cut down on the numbers of stray animals, helping to reduce the strain on local authorities and charities.

Is it expensive?
Costs for ID chips vary from £15.00 and £20.00 at private clinics while some charities offer them for free.

For more useful information on how ID chips work and why it’s important to use them, take a look at this helpful guide from Sainsbury’s Bank:

www.sainsburysbank.co.uk/money-matters/pet-microchipping.shtml

Pet Microchipping Essentials

 

Common Diseases Found in Pets

Pets rely heavily on their owners to keep them healthy. Animal diseases can become a problem even when the animal is attended to daily, but there are very common animal diseases that can spread or worsen within a short period of time. Upon recognizing the signs that something is wrong, a quick visit to the veterinarian can help prevent the disease from getting worse. Here are the top 10 most common animal diseases to be aware of.

Gum Disease
Gingivitis is probably the most common disease found in pets. Signs to look for are bad breath, lack of appetite, weight loss, and rotting teeth. It can be prevented with annual check ups and periodical teeth cleaning. There are tartar removal treats for pets, but it will not prevent gingivitis. Neglect will cause further issues leading to periodartitis which causes inflammation, bleeding, and recessed gums and loose teeth.

Lymphocytic Plasmacytic Stomatitis
LPS is a cardiovascular disease that’s an autoimmune deficiency. It’s typically a secondary symptom from something greater effecting the animal such as a viral infection that includes Leukemia or Herpes. These diseases can be prevented with annual check ups. Lack of activity and appetite are signs. It can be triggered by an allergy to tartar on the teeth. Antibiotics can help treat this disease.

Heartworms
Heartworms are commonly found in hunting dogs. Some symptoms are vomiting, coughing, heavy breathing, lack of energy, sudden weight loss, and an extreme change in appetite. Regular check ups with the veterinarian and monthly medication helps prevent heartworms. Cats have a very strong immune response to heartworms and it’s a rare case. Sometimes heartworms can be mistaken for asthma, but if left untreated they’ll die.

Tapeworms
These parasites live in the intestines of the host, robbing the animal of nutrients. Caused by swallowing a flea typically while grooming, these worms can be seen in feces and in bedding. A severe infestation will increase appetite and decrease weight. With dewormer and monthly flea treatment, tapeworms will die off.
Skin Infections
Loss of hair is the most common sign of a skin infection. Itchy dry skin leads to hot spots and the pet will continue to lick the area. Ointment can help treat this along with recommended allergy shots provided by the doctor. Allergies and parasites can cause skin infections to occur.

Diabetes
When the pancreas isn’t producing enough insulin, it becomes inflamed and diabetes can occur. This is most common in overweight pets. Sometimes a drug taken can cause diabetes as it interferes with the insulin process. Take notice to large amount of urine and excessive drinking.

Cystitis
This is a bladder infection caused by bacteria. Signs to look for include painful urination, pet urinating in odd areas and blood in urine. Treatment can be done by the veterinarian.

Kidney Failure
This is a breakdown of the kidneys which regulates blood and water levels in the body. This could lead to death if not caught immediately. It can be caused by an ingestion of antifreeze or a severe illness. Signs to look for is lack of coordination, vomiting, not eating, and seizures.

Parvovirus
One of the most contagious viruses, Parvo is among the top 10 most common animal diseases among dogs. Signs to look for are lethargy, vomiting, decreased appetite, and diarrhea leading to life-threatening dehydration. Prevent Parvo with vaccinations.

Rabies
As one of the top 10 most common animal diseases, Rabies is probably the least common. It’s a virus that’s easily transmitted from one infected animal to another by a simple bite. With proper vaccinations Rabies can be prevented. Signs are aggression, restlessness, irritability, and eventually paralysis, disorientation, and foaming at the mouth.

As these top 10 most common animal diseases tend to be a pet owner’s worst nightmare, most can be treated. Vet Lab Supplies provides veterinary hospitals with proper equipment that allows the doctor to make a correct diagnosis and treat the conditions.

Vetlab

Need some tips on how to prepare your pets for the summer months?

Watch our video with Steve Backshall and vet Paul Manketelow to get clued up

Just what do we need to know to make sure our pets are happy and healthy in the summer months? All too often it’s obvious things that get forgotten, from hydration to parasite protection to heat stroke.

Hydration is absolutely key in the warmer months and it’s advisable to make sure that you not only keep their usual bowl topped up, but also consider having other water bowls accessible to encourage your animals to keep hydrated.

Try to walk when it’s cooler so before 11am, or after 3pm.  Make sure you pick up a travelling water bottle, so you can give them a quick drink to stop your dog from overheating.  Most important, make sure you check the ground isn’t too hot for your pet’s paws. Parasites thrive in warm conditions therefore it’s important to keep your pets protected from parasites all year round and particularly in the summer months. Your pet can be subjected to parasites more frequently in the warmer conditions, and they can easily be picked up in whilst enjoying a walk in the countryside or visiting your local park.

Watch our video for hints and tips on how to keep your pet happy and healthy this summer

The secret life of fleas

The secret life of fleas – watch our video for a close up look at what fleas get up to on your pet

As new research is released today that shows that pet owners feel embarrassed when their pet has fleas – our video gives a microscopic view of these parasites and even their eggs as they hatch

Fleas can be the bane of pet owner’s lives and are not only an issue for our furry friends themselves, but also for us humans.

New research released today by Bayer Animal Health looks at how many pet owners have found these parasites not only on their pets, but in carpets, beds, sofas and on themselves.

Many surveyed also admitted to not being as on top as they should be of taking preventative measures when it comes to fleas.

But if you’ve ever needed a reason to increase your pet’s flea treatments then watch our video for a very close up look at the secret life of fleas, from how they feed, to the hatching of their eggs.

Celebs and pet owners get the inside word on ticks and fleas at ‘Tick-Nic’ event

In support of Bayer’s ‘No Bite Is Right’ campaign ‘Tick-Nics’ have been held around the country where celebs such as TOWIE’s Lydia Bright and Brendan Lynch former finalist on the Great British Bake Off have mixed with dog owners for plenty of advice on keeping their pets free from pests this summer

This month is Lyme Disease Awareness month, with the disease commonly spread by ticks. It can affect both animals and humans and in the latter symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue and a pink or red circular rash. If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart and the nervous system

TV Vet David Grant has been giving advice to pet owners around the country on the risks of ticks to both pets and their owners, where ticks are commonly found, how to remove them and how to prevent them.

Watch our video where dog loving celebrities Lydia Bright from TOWIE and Brendan Lynch former finalist on the Great British Bake Off, mix with dog owners for plenty of advice from David and other vets on how to keep the creepy-crawlies off their furry friends this summer.

Learn how to protect your dog from ticks with Chris Packham

Watch our show live from the New Forest to learn how to check and protect your dogs against ticks

Show date: Thursday 23rd April
Show time: 2:45pm

Vets across the UK are set to take part in the Big Tick Project, launching on Thursday 23rd April. This will see dog owners collecting ticks from their pets throughout the UK in a bid to help scientists track what is feared to be a growing threat to dogs and people from tick-borne diseases such as Lyme Disease.

Lyme Disease is caused by a bite from an infected tick. Dogs can be bitten while walking through wooded areas or parkland in both towns and the countryside. Symptoms include lameness, lethargy and fever.  If left untreated they can lead to more serious conditions such as kidney disease and heart failure.  Many cases of tick infestation are likely to go unnoticed by owners as they are only detected by a thorough examination.

The Big Tick Project is being supported by TV presenter, naturalist and dog lover Chris Packham, and aims to raise awareness of the risks and symptoms associated with tick-borne disease, and to educate owners how they can reduce their dog’s exposure to ticks and the diseases they carry.

Ticks on dogs

Throughout spring and early summer when ticks are most active, vets taking part in the Big Tick Project will be giving dogs visiting their practice a thorough tick check.

Tune into our live programme to learn how you can identify and remove ticks correctly from your dogs, as well as highlighting how vets can offer the best ways to prevent and control ticks and fleas, tailored to individual pets needs.

Chris Packham joins veterinary dermatologist Paul Sands MRCVS and dog owners for MyPetonline’s latest web vet clinic on ticks as part of the Big Tick Project and Big Flea Guarantee campaigns.

Autumn Vet Clinic for dog owners with Chris Packham and vet Paul Sands

Log on to our live and interactive web TV show to for tips and advice on how to make sure your dog stays healthy and happy this autumn

Show date: Tuesday 23rd September
Show time: 13.00

Keeping our precious pooches healthy is the number one priority for responsible pet owners, yet how many of us only take our dogs to the vet when they get sick, or they are in pain?

Preventative health care is a key aspect of responsible dog ownership, and moving from the summer months into autumn and eventually winter can be a challenging time.

On the back of long, dry summer and mild autumn, we can expect to see a much higher prevalence of ticks.

And as we move into the cooler winter months and turn on our central heating, we need to be aware of the potential for fleas to multiply in our warm homes. So what do we need to look out for, to ensure our pets are not subjected to unwanted passengers and the diseases they can bring.

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Log on to our web TV show where Chris Packham and leading vet, Paul Sands, will talk through what you can do to ensure your dogs remain parasite and disease free.